The Dallas Movie Screening Group

This is the homepage of the Dallas Movie Screening Group. To join our mailing list you must sign up at our group page on Yahoo. You will then be connected to receive notices on how to find passes to the local screenings in the DFW area. It's up to you to pickup or sign up for passes. You can also barter, trade or just giveaway passes you don't want, need or share with other members of the group. Please read the instructions on the Yahoo page very carefully before posting. This group is closely moderated so that your mail box is not full of spam or other unnecessary mail. We appreciate everyone's consideration and cooperation.

You can use this homepage for posting comments, reviews, and other things that cannot be posted to the group. Of course spam is not allowed. Thanks!

To join the Dallas Movie Screening Yahoo Group:

Reesa's Reviews can also be found at:

Logo art by Steve Cruz

Website and Group Contact:

Sunday, March 18, 2018

Movies Scheduled for the Week of Mar 18 - Mar 24

Well, it looks like there is a full week ahead as we are anticipating the big Avenger movie coming out next month. It's gonna be crazy. Just remember if you don't get a pass, you can skip the line and get your self a ticket.

Weather is getting warm. Spring Break is over. If I missed anything on the calendar, please email me before the calendar comes out on Sunday so it can be included. Don't forget to include the source of the passes. Thanks.

March 18 - March 24

Sun - Mar 18

SIREN Series Premiere + Mermaid Party - 6:45 pm - Alamo Drafthouse Richardson and Cedars

Mon - Mar 19

Unsane - 7:30 pm - Angelika Dallas

Tue - Mar 20

Death of Stalin - 7:00 pm - Magnolia
Pacific Rim Uprising - 7:00 pm - AMC Northpark

Wed - Mar 21

Blockers - 7:00 pm - UA Fossil Creek
Midnight Sun - 7:00 pm - Studio Movie Grill Northwest Hwy

Thu - Mar 22

Sherlock Gnomes - 7:00 pm - AMC Northpark
Sherlock Gnomes - 7:00 pm - Cinemark 17

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Thursday, March 15, 2018

The Leisure Seeker

(Review by Chase Lee)

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I Can Only Imagine

Religious based films are often as subtle as a 2x4 across the back of the head in their cinematic message of forgiveness, redemption and accepting Jesus in one's life. This story is about the making of the contemporary Christian song by MercyMe which became the most played song of the genre, even crossing over to pop and country charts. Directors Andrew Erwin and Jon Erwin , with a script by Alex Cramer, Jon Erwin, and Brent McCorkle, centers around the lead singer, Bart Millard, who wrote the song about his relationship with his father. It's a feel good film, with a strong message that doesn't, fortunately, feel heavy handed and manipulative.

Broadway actor/singer J. Michael Finley plays Bart Millard who after years of abuse by his father Arthur (Dennis Quaid), finds the strength to leave home where he joins the band. The movie begins of him telling the story about how his iconic song which may have been written in a couple minutes, but it encapsulates the years of trauma and rediscovery of his early life. As a child, Bart's mother left the family having had enough of her abusive husband, leaving Bart alone with his dad. Brody Rose plays the young Bart who finds support and love from his Meemaw (Cloris Leachman) and from his friends. Discovering he can sing Mrs. Fincher (Priscilla Shirer) the choir director asks Bart to be the lead in the high school musical of Oklahoma. When he leaves home he joins the band MercyMe when one of their members leave them in a lurch. They play churches, and small venues hoping to be discovered. Trace Adkins is Scott Brickell, who becomes their manager, sees something in them but tells them they are not quite there yet. They need to find their voice. Even after to cutting their own self produced album, music producers weigh in heavily that they don't quite cut it. Frustrated Bart decides to take a break from the band and go home to take care of his dad who is dying of cancer.

It's amazing that Bart was able to break the cycle of abuse considering how he was treated as child. He faced life with self deprecating humor and tried to look at the positive. But that unresolved trauma in his live leads him to break up with his long time girlfriend Shannon (Madeline Carroll). Coming home, his father, who has found God, and is remorseful for the way he treated his son. Bart finally comes to terms with his father before he passes. When he comes back to the band, the song "I Can Only Imagine" comes to him from his notebooks that have that phrase written all over them. It was a song that apparently touched everyone's life in a meaningful way to become the all time best selling contemporary Christian single to this day.
(Review by reesa)

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The Leisure Seeker

Director Paolo Virzi in his first English-language film, working from a script he co-wrote with Stephen Amidon, Francesca Archibugi and Francesco Piccolo (based on Michael Zadoorian’s novel) is a gentle and affectionate travel log of an elderly couple's last vacation in their beloved RV. The loving couple dealing with health issues embark on adventures that are full of improbable gag set ups and misunderstandings as they travel from their home in Massachusetts to Florida.

Helen Mirren as Ella embraces a touch and go southern accent as the devoted wife of 50 years to her husband John played by Donald Sutherland. John was a well loved English professor who now suffers from dementia. His moments of lucidity are getting few and far between. Ella spends a lot of time trying to keep the memories alive. The pressure grows on her as she is also suffering from some aliment which causes her nausea and she is popping lots of pills. She also drinks a lot of her favorite Canadian whiskey. The RV dubbed the Leisure Seeker was their family get-a-way. Their children Jane and Will (Janel Moloney and Christian McKay) are all grown up and are freaked that their parents have suddenly taken off in the clunky old Winnebago without a word. At each campsite, Ella screens a slide show for John playing their lives, their children, neighbors and his students. Despite John's memory lapses, he is still able to drive the RV as Ella claims she can't handle it on her own. But that doesn't stop him from taking off after a pit stop leaving Ella behind. A motorcyclist gives her a ride to catch up with her clueless husband, who only berates her for riding a bike without a helmet.

John's memory glitches sometimes questions Ella as to who she is and where is his young beautiful wife. Other times, he displays moments of insecurity about one of Ella's old boyfriends that he suspects her of keeping contact. At one point she gets so frustrated, she tells him they will go find Dan (Dick Gregory) who is currently residing in a nursing home and doesn't know them. Ella also finds out by manipulating her husband's into discovering his own indiscretions which angers her so much, she drops him off at a nursing home. When her anger subsides, she realizes that she can't live without him, and he can't live without her. As their physical maladies become apparent, Ella realizes their trip only has one solution.

Mirren who was nominated for a Golden Globe for this role, is delightful as the gregarious Ella. She is personable, friendly and is able to talk to anyone, anywhere, anytime. Her academic husband is more apt to school waitstaff and others with Hemingway which bores Ella to tears. Yet despite their differences they remain so totally in love. Even their son Will felt left out over their attention paid only to each other. One wonders how old age will treat us when our time comes. Will we be able watch the one we love fade and forget?
(Review by reesa)

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Love, Simon

Reel Time with Joel and Chase

Dear World,

Come Out and See My Movie. It’s Pretty Great. This is a New Classic in the Making.

Love, Simon

Rating: PG-13 for Thematic Elements, Sexual References, Language and Teen Partying

Run Time: Ihr & 49min

Joel’s Review

***½ (out of ****)
Only those who have experienced this phenomenon can understand it on an experiential level, but Love, Simon comes close to visualizing the coming-out process as the threshold event that it is. The concept of its difficulties isn’t hard to grasp, though: Not only does one come to understand the way one’s hormones work after years of feeling a disconnect from the way they “should” work, but one comes to such an understanding that the feeling then flowers into a need to tell someone. Everything, though, must be right: the time to say it, the person (or people) to tell, the courage to tell them, and the extenuating circumstances of everything leading up to that moment.

It seems that such a moment is likely improbable, if not completely impossible. Something, by the law of averages, must go wrong with every coming-out moment for those who fit some initial within the LGBTQ community (and, of course, the other letters in that shorthand). If everything is right, simply because of the chaotic way the world works, that is probably going to be the exception, rather than the rule. For the protagonist of director Greg Berlanti’s film, the only right thing when the moment comes is the understanding of the person he tells. That person is the last he expected to be on the receiving end of such a revelation, the timing is far from ideal, and the place is in his car while at a stop sign.

Love, Simon is about every aspect of coming out, including the unfortunate ones. When the eponymous Simon (Nick Robinson) later reveals that he is gay to three of the most important people in his life, it is only by choice if “choice” is technically the same thing as “duress.” It’s a desperate move to get on the same page as those people he cares about before word gets out in a different, more embarrassing way. I’m getting ahead of myself, though no one should be completely surprised by the development that occurs. Given that I have already established that the unwanted acts of cruelty that often follow such a revelation are a subject of the movie, expect a character who is both cruel and callow to show up.

For the purposes of fairness to readers, I will not mention that character explicitly, though I will mention in passing that it involves a blackmail scheme for the character in question to get in the good graces of the person to whom Simon first tells his secret. Abby (Alexandra Shipp) has only been a part of a quartet of friends, who also include Leah (Katherine Langford) and Nick (Jorge Lendeborg Jr.), for a few months at the start of our story. Simon, Leah, and Nick have all known each other “since the beginning of time,” according to Simon. None of them knows Simon’s secret, and meanwhile, Leah pines for him and Nick for Abby.

An anonymous student comes out as gay at Simon’s school, whose headmaster (played by Tony Hale) pretends way too hard to be his pupils’ friend while also confiscating their smartphones in the hallway with too much glee, and Simon begins a series of email threads with the person in question, calling himself “Blue” and empathizing with Simon’s closeted existence. That’s when the blackmail scheme begins, and it is here where the screenplay could have spun wildly off-course, marketing in every tired trope of the coming-of-age comedy while trying to operate within the current social climate (Indeed, our President is theirs, and the older generation’s passive attitude toward a certain sexual predator when he was more famous for being a comedian is referenced).

It is a testament, then, that Berlanti and screenwriters Elizabeth Berger and Isaac Aptaker (adapting a novel by Becky Albertalli) avoid all these trappings for a more honest and compassionate view of everyone (except that pesky blackmailer, who might play too big a role for being a device to rile up the emotions) who is an active presence in Simon’s life. When the revelation occurs more immediately and publicly than Simon wants, other consequences – some of them reflecting upon him poorly – occur but not in a way that seems to punish Simon for his sexuality. Instead, it exists to illustrate the spider-web of consequences that can come from such acts of cruel opportunism.

The film also pays careful attention to Simon’s home life. His father (played by Josh Duhamel) cracks casually homophobic jokes in a way that suggests he probably doesn’t mean or understand a word of them. His mother (played by Jennifer Garner, who gets to reaffirm her love for her son at a crucial, cautiously performed moment) is proudly liberal, refusing to shelter her kids for the sake of arbitrary family values. His sister (played by Talitha Bateman) cooks meals of questionable quality on her way to becoming the next top chef who will not be chopped. Once the revelation hits home, the filmmakers take advantage of the opportunity to see a decent family processing a huge truth with rare honesty.

Robinson’s performance more than simply anchors the film. This is a compelling portrayal of internalization that explodes into deserved angst only when necessary. It’s a great performance from an actor who is likely to have (if we are lucky to be blessed this way) a storied career on the evidence of this role. Love, Simon is a heartfelt surprise, a coming-of-age tale that doesn’t coast on the clich├ęs of its genre but embraces them, melding drama with some genuinely funny high-school comedy into a special thing, indeed.
(Review by Joel Copling)

(Review by Chase Lee)

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Sunday, March 11, 2018

Movies Scheduled for the Week of Mar 11 - Mar 17

Hope y'all changed your clocks today.

It looked like there wasn't going to be much going on this week, but it filled out quickly. Hope you got the passes you needed.

Is it just me, but if you are part of our Facebook group, how is it that you don't know about the Yahoo Group so you can get passes? Just wondering.

Mar 11 - Mar 17

Mon - Mar 12

Leisure Seeker - 7:00 pm - Angelika Dallas
Blockers - 7:30 pm - Cinemark West

Tue - Mar 13

Tomb Raider - 7:00 pm - AMC Northpark

Wed - Mar 14

Midnight Sun - 7:00 pm - AMC Valley View
Love, Simon - 7:30 pm - AMC Northpark

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