The Dallas Movie Screening Group

This is the homepage of the Dallas Movie Screening Group. To join our mailing list you must sign up at our group page on Yahoo. You will then be connected to receive notices on how to find passes to the local screenings in the DFW area. It's up to you to pickup or sign up for passes. You can also barter, trade or just giveaway passes you don't want, need or share with other members of the group. Please read the instructions on the Yahoo page very carefully before posting. This group is closely moderated so that your mail box is not full of spam or other unnecessary mail. We appreciate everyone's consideration and cooperation.

You can use this homepage for posting comments, reviews, and other things that cannot be posted to the group. Of course spam is not allowed. Thanks!

To join the Dallas Movie Screening Yahoo Group:
dallasmoviescreenings-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Reesa's Reviews can also be found at:
http://www.moviegeekfeed.com

Logo art by Steve Cruz http://www.mfagallery.com

Website and Group Contact: dalscreenings@gmail.com

Thursday, September 29, 2016

Masterminds




If I Had Surgery, I Might Have Busted Some Stitches

Opening

As someone who doesn’t like Napoleon Dynamite or Nacho Libre, I was going into this ready to hate it. I am now a fan of Director Jared Hess. Let’s get reel and break this down.

Plot
A night guard at an armored car company in the Southern U.S. organizes one of the biggest bank heists in American history.

Directing/Writing

Pros

Being based on an unbelievable true story, this movie is insane, dumb, and downright entertaining in the best way possible. Hess brings his staple of awkward and dry humor and it works so well with the characters and their lack of common sense and buffoonery. What Hess does very well with his style of humor is that he isn’t scared to do the lowest common denominator in terms of humor i.e. poop and sex jokes; but he does them so unexpectedly and straight-faced that you can’t help but laugh.

Cons
The first five to ten minutes were absolutely humorless and I was extremely worried about the rest of the movie. But there was some mystical mist that washed over me because after that bump in the road, I found myself enjoying it and laughing way more than I probably should have.

Acting

Pros

The whole cast is on point with the improv and straight-faced attitude giving each line of dialogue a breath of greatness. Listen, it isn’t easy delivering dry, very dry, bone dry, humor but everyone is on their A-Game. Out of the ensemble, Jason Sudeikis is my favorite. Let me know in the comments who is your favorite!

Cons
None.

Cinematography

Pros

Most of the shot selections are softly lit and averagely composed but the “action” sequences are some of the best comedic moments as they are shot and edited very epically but what’s happening on screen is on a small scale.

Cons
None.

Editing/Special Effects

Pros

If you love Napoleon Dynamite and/or Nacho Libre, then the entertaining level will be through the roof and you will be enjoying yourself. The energy of the comedy is palpable and makes this movie feel like half of its time length and that’s the best compliment I can give it.

Cons
Like I mentioned above, the first ten minutes were rough and it almost turned me off but then it reeled me in, hook, line and sinker.

Overall

Simply put, I was surprised on how much I enjoyed myself. Is it weird, awkward, juvenile, dumb but color me surprised its really funny.

Grade

B

(Review by Chase Lee)




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Is That a Gun in your Pocket?





Flaccid All Around

Opening


Didn’t Chi-Raq come out last year? This story has been told many, many times and this is another interpretation of it. You were expecting a great opening but this is all I got. Let’s get reel and break this down.

Plot

If there's one thing that the men of Rockford Texas love as much as their women, it's their guns. But when a gun incident at a neighborhood school spurs one stay at home mom, Jenna (Andrea Anders), to rethink Rockford's obsessive gun culture, life in this idyllic town is turned upside-down. Much to the chagrin of her husband, (Matt Passmore), Jenna ignites a movement by recruiting the women to withhold sex from the men until every gun in Rockford is vanquished. A wild and hilarious showdown ensues between the sexes. As tensions and libidos rise, the men and women of Rockford must decide what's really important: keeping the peace or getting a piece.

Play its Based off of

A Greek play named "Lysistrata" written by Aristophanes and first performed in 411 BC. In the play, Lysistrata persuades the women of Greece to withhold sexual privileges from their husbands until they negotiate a peaceful end to the Peloponnesian War.

Directing/Writing

Pros

At least it’s a coherent story? I will give the director props for taking an issue like gun control and shed it in this lighter side and have some dramatic pull. By doing this, you can really open people’s eyes to the issue that may have been shy to talk about it and sometimes they might be persuaded to take action to standup against it. However…

Cons
…the lighter comedy aspect isn’t really funny or entertaining. All the humor felt forced and they were really striving for the raunchy humor, ironically which is little to none present, especially it having the “R” rating and the content presented in the story. The dramatic scenes also didn’t pull me in as much as I wanted to. Maybe it’s because the humor turned me off so early in the film, but then again, I am an idiot.

Acting

Pros

Everyone is fine. It could be worse.

Cons
None.

Cinematography

Pros

It is shot with a bright, sterile look so there aren’t really any risks with the cinematography. It’s safe.

Cons
None.

Editing/Special Effects

Pros

None.

Cons
The whole hour and half is rough. It feels like a two hour plus film and it drags because of the lack of humor or entertainment.

Overall
This is without a doubt the blandest film I have seen this year. Nothing terrible, nothing great, it is what it is. While writing this review, I actually have forgotten about most of the scenes in the movie.

Grade

C

(Review by Chase Lee)





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The Dressmaker




A black comedy revenge drama does not really describe this new film directed by Jocelyn Moorhouse who also wrote the script with P.J. Hogan. It’s based on the novel of the same name by Rosalie Ham who had wrote a treatment of her own novel back in 2000. The movie had its world premiere at the 2015 Toronto International Film Festival and opened in Australia and New Zealand in October 2015 becoming the second highest grossing Australian film of that year. It’s also had thirteen nominations at the 5th AACTA Awards. If that is not impressive enough, then just consider it stars Kate Winslet. That’s pretty much all you need to know.

Set in an Australian outback town named Dungatar in 1951, Myrtle (Kate Winslet) returns to town after 25 years away working as a dressmaker for designers all over the world. Impeccably attired with bright red lipstick she looks totally out of place in this small town caught in a time warp. She is greeted by police sergeant Farrat (Hugo Weaving) who is enamoured by her dress that he identifies as Dior. Tilly, as she prefers to be known, has come back to care for her mother(Judy Davis) nicknamed “Mad Molly” by the rest of the town. Her mother lives up to the town’s name, living in squalor and not recognizing her daughter. Tilly wants to discover what happened during the events of 1926 that led her to be sent away and separated with her mother.

The town folk discover Tilly is back when she appears at the local football game dressed in a bright red dress, causing the town team to become distracted. The handsome Teddy (Liam Hemsworth) asks her to change her gown. She does, only this time it’s strapless black gown with a high leg slit. She turns her alluring wattage on the other team, causing them to lose. Gertrude (Sarah Snook), the daughter of the town’s store has her eyes on William Beaumont (James Mackay) who has returned after living in West Australia. His mother wants to marry him off to some well to do young woman, not to the dowdy Gert. She takes up Tilly's offer to make her the bell of the Footballer’s Ball winning Williams attention in exchange for information on that happened to Stewart Pettyman. The son of town councillor Evan Pettyman (Shane Bourne) who died with everyone believing Tilly did it. Although everyone fears Tilly, they come to her to replicate the success she had with Gert who is now engaged to William. Pettyman brings in another dressmaker Una Pleasance (Sacha Horler) to compete with Tilly’s business.

Flashback haunt Tilly with the memories of the bully Stewart. Her mother still acting crazy slowly thaws to her daughter who believes her life is cursed. A short romance with Teddy almost lifts Tilly out of her fear to love, but tragedy forces karma to have its ultimate revenge. There are so many unusual characters with their secrets and unsavory natures that are slowly revealed. A lot of events occur, that you think it couldn’t get any more complicated. But by the end you will forgive the films inconsistencies and its two hour running time, and say “right on”.
(Review by reesa)



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Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children




Tim Burton is well known for directing unusual movies that don’t follow the well beaten paths. If you are a fan of his work, this movie will not disappoint. Based on the 2011 novel of the same name by Ranson Riggs, the screenplay written by Jane Goldman captures the elements from the young adult book which was a story woven around old photographs. Burton’s movies are filled with interesting visuals, set decorations and fantastical elements that will keep one glued to the screen. The story which is sort of Harry Potter and the X-Men with time travel stands on it’s own, but may be scary for small children.

Jake (Asa Butterfiled), a 16 year old American teenager, had an awkward childhood of never quite fitting in. He is close to his grandfather, Abe (Terence Stamp) who would tell him of his childhood in an orphanage and the peculiar children who lived there. One day his grandfather calls him saying he is not safe. The tragedy that follows leads Jake to see this monstrous creature. His parents take him to a psychiatrist (Allison Janney) who encourages him to visit his grandfather’s home in Wales so he can have some closure. His father Franklin (Chris O’Dowd) had a troubled relationship with Abe, and hopes that Jake will realize his grandfather was just filling his head with stories and go back to being a normal teenager.

Except their trip to the small town on a Welsh island takes an extraordinary turn. The Victorian orphanage of his grandfather turns out to be a bombed out ruin destroyed on September 3, 1943. He goes back again, only to see some children, and runs after them, knocking himself out in the process. When he awakes he’s at the orphanage, but it’s 1943 and everything is restored. He meets Miss Peregrine (Eva Green) the headmistress with the ability to transform into a peregrine falcon and manipulate time. As well as an assortment of children who Jake immediately recognizes from his grandfather’s stories.

Jake learns the monster who killed his grandfather is a Hollow, a creature that is used by the Wights, undead humans that hunt and kill peculiars for their abilities. Lead by Mr. Barron (Samuel L. Jackson), an eyeball eating mad scientist, they experiment on Ymbrynes who can change into one kind of bird and create and maintain a time loop. The Wights are trying to find a way to become immortal. The Ymbrynes hide in their time loops from the Wights and Hollows, but there is word that some time loops are being destroyed and the children are gone. When Miss Peregrine is captured by the Wights, Jake must use the peculiarity that he inherited by his grandfather, to help right the world.

The story is unveiled from Jake’s standpoint, so the viewer discovers that peculiar children through his eyes. Each are unique in their abilities, and welcome Jake who reminds them of his grandfather who had lived with them at one time. There’s an invisible boy, a small girl with a mouth behind her head, a preteen that grow and control plants, a boy who can resurrect dead for short times, a kid with a beehive in his stomach, a boy with prophetic dreams, a pyrokinetic teen, and inhumanly strong child, and aerokinetic young woman who has to wear leaded shoes or be tethered so she can’t fly away. It’s really nice to see Tim Burton is back to his usual form with another movie that will stand repeated viewing.
(Review by reesa)



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Kampai! For the Love of Sake





Many movies have been made about the distillation of spirits to create wine, whiskey, and beer, but this new documentary by Mirai Konishi takes us into the world of Sake, the Japanese culture and cuisine. The fermented rice wine can be served warm or cold is the preferred drink of choice with sushi. As the new brewers evolve from the ancient traditions, Sake is now adapting into the global marketplace.

The arduous process to extract sake from rice is created by sprinkling koji yeast to begin the fermentation process which begins by hand washing the rice and working for long hours. Breweries have been usually been kept in families for many generations, with the owners basically working as salesman, and the brewer master controlling the rice cleaning, yeast and distilling processes. There are scenes of shirtless men moving the rice around by hand. There are also many scenes of sake tastings at colleges studying the aggro-business, and sake conventions where you can sample various products.

The film also tells the story of sake from the perspective of a fifth generations brewer Kosuke Kuji who defied tradition by being an owner who also brews. He also has a You Tube channel about educating people on sake. An he’s taken his product outside of Japan trying to develop new markets. There’s also a story about Philip Harper from Cornwall, England who came to Japan to teach English and ended up serving a grueling 10 year apprenticeship at the sake brewery, rising to become the first non-Japanese master brewer. Another principal subject is John Gauntner the self described “sake evangelist” who has authored Sake Confidential and has become the world’s leading non-Japanese sake expert.

While some of the stories are interesting, one really doesn’t know all that much about how sake is made. There are about a thousand brewers in Japan almost like micro-brewers of beer in the U.S. Individual processes are probably highly guarded secrets passed down over the years, but these brewers endeavor to develop new products for consumption. With more international attention on sake, there’s even a brewer in North Carolina that is breaking into the sake market.

The word Kampai comes from a Japanese toast. While watching this film you may wish you had some sake to go with it. It may make the movie, which sometimes feels like a promotional film, more interesting to sit through. Kampai! For the Love of Sake opens at the Texas Theater, October 1, 2016.
(Review by reesa)




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Sunday, September 25, 2016

Movies Scheduled 9/25-10/1

Wohoooo it is the last week of September! Fall is my favorite season by far!

Make sure you check out the calendar before you ask for passes. If you hit the movie we post the links for passes and sometimes they aren't all gone. Sure if they are gone then it is no problem to ask if someone has a extra pass. Also make sure to wait until the contests are over and know that some outlets don't hand out passes until the day or two before the screening. So you may still have a chance and it is better to grab your own just in case they ask for ID. Yes it is rare but it has happened before that people have been turned away due to the name isn't the same that is on the pass.

If you don't have any plans today at 3 p.m. Big Fan Boy will be at Zeus Comics for national comic book day and he will be handing out comic book movie swag.

If you have any questions please feel free to email me at damitdaina@hotmail.com


Sunday Sept. 25th


Monday Sept. 26th


Tuesday Sept. 27th

The Dressmaker Angelika Dallas
Deep Water Horizon Angelika Dallas


Wednesday Sept. 28th

OUIJA: ORIGIN OF EVIL Cinemark West
Masterminds Angelika Dallas


Thursday Sept. 29th


Friday Sept. 30th


Saturday Oct. 1st


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Sunday, September 18, 2016

Movies Scheduled 9/18-9/24

Finally Fall is arriving. Fall is my favorite season!

We try to get to y'als request to trade passes but sometimes we are not always on the internet. So please make sure to get them in as quickly as you can. I really want y'all to be able to see the movie you want.

If you have any questions please email me at damitdaina@hotmail.com


Sunday Sept. 18th


Monday Sept. 19th

Queen of Katwe Cinemark 17


Tuesday Sept. 20th

Queen of Katwe AMC Parks and Angelika Dallas
Storks AMC Northpark
The Magnificent Seven TBA

Wednesday Sept. 21st

Dirty 30 SMG Spring Valley
The Magnificent Seven Cinemark 17


Thursday Sept. 22nd


Friday Sept. 23rd


Saturday Sept. 24th


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Thursday, September 15, 2016

Max Rose





This slightly disappointing film tells the story of Max, an old man who has just lost his wife of considerable time. His family is a bit dysfunctional and he finds out some years before his wife dies that she had cheated on him with another man. Consequently, he digs deeper into this hidden affair. The film pans in and out of Max’s memories of life with his woman where the character suddenly appears eerily in the house. Jerry Lewis, who plays Max, along with Kevin Pollack, who plays Max’s son, are probably the only two actors who carried the show.

The story wasn’t very interesting and I feel that such a revelation of an affair that late in a marriage deserved some better plot points. A sense of adventure was lacked in this picture where there could have been a lot implemented. Kerry Bishé did not perform very well as I felt that one could tell she was acting. Some lines were a bit hard to hear from her and I felt like the independent film stereotype surfaced unfortunately in her scenes.

Some segments in the film did contain some good entertaining like the moments where Max is in his house alone late at night. I do not care for spooky films but these scenes provided that sense of the haunting of the affair. He tears into drawers and knocks over books in an intense search that instantly engages the viewer.

The idea of the sadness that comes to the elderly sometimes when they enter a nursing home was well communicated in a scene. Max has been torn from his house and is put in a facility that he feels not at all comfortable in. One felt his loneliness in his situation. A tense relationship that basically constitutes the dysfunction of the Rose family comes in a father-son type. Pollack and Lewis exchanged meaningful and clear lines that represented the flaws in their characters’ past.

Max and his granddaughter’s relationship was pleasant to see as one could understand the bond that they had. Although their scenes were restricted by some lackluster deliverance of lines, they were well scripted.

I’m always happy to see films come out that weren’t horrible and just made for money. Although the film was less than what I was expecting, it was a palatable story. It was a long process for this project to be released and the filmmakers should be happy that it’s out.
(Review by Wyatt Head)



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Snowden



Should Edward Snowden be tried for treason, or is he a heroic whistleblower? According to director Oliver Stone, you will be urged to feel some sympathy towards his current situation. Stone who wrote the script with Kieran Fitzgerald based the story on the books The Snowden Files by Luke Harding and the Time of the Octopus by Anatoly Kucherena. The movie covers the career of the American computer wunderkind who leaked classified information from the National Security Agency to The Guardian in 2013. The real Snowden who now is living in asylum in Russia shows up at the end of film via an online broadcast.

Snowden (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) had enlisted in the U.S. Army Reserve as a Special Forces candidate, but he broke both his legs during the training. He began working for the CIA despite the fact he didn’t have a high school diploma and only a GED. He was basically self taught and proved his worth during his classes. Earning the respect of this teacher Corbin O’Brain (Rhys Ifans) who takes him under his wing. Nicolas Gage shows up as another teacher Hank Forrester. Snowden also meets his love interest Lindsay Mills (Shailene Woodley) though an online dating site. Despite their liberal vs. conservative beliefs, they are both smitten with each other. She is an amateur photographer and he can’t tell her what he is doing.

It’s no doubt that Snowden was a brilliant computer geek. He’s given some very important jobs with very secretive projects. But then some of the work begins to nudge his strong sense of patriotic right and wrongs. The computer jargon is pretty heavy, so unless one is a nerd to it will fly over one’s head. As he moves from one agency to another, his relationship with his girlfriend is sorely tested. His story is told in a series of flashbacks as he is holed up in a Hong Kong hotel while he records his interview with a reporter (Zachary Quinto), photographer (Melissa Leo) and Guardian journalist (Tom Wilkinson). He knows that the government will soon discover that he took the information regarding the surveillance of everyone via phones, webcams, internet and everything. Terrorism is the excuse but it’s all about economic control.

Whether you believe that Snowden should be charged with espionage, or pardoned as a whistle blower is the debate for the future. But there is no denying that the capacity to keep the big brother watching can be easily manipulated to something darker and more sinister depending on who is in governing the country. And that is something we should all be seriously cognizant.
(Review by reesa)





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Bridget Jones's Baby






Bridget Jones is back in an amusing continuation of the romantic confusion of her life. The third film of the franchise was directed by Sharon Maguire and written by Helen Fielding, Dan Mazer and Emma Thompson. Renee Zellweger looking a bit different from the last movies and a little bit more worn out, doesn’t really make single working women very appealing as she still sees herself incomplete without a lovelife.

It’s Bridget’s 43rd birthday. She’s working as a producer for a news program where her friend, the on air talent Miranda (Sarah Solemani) urges her to get out and “shag” someone. Bridget has pretty much accepted being a spinster and embracing her singleness. So she is feeling a little more disconcerted when she attends a funeral for her old boss and lover Daniel who went missing on a plane. She runs into Darcy (Colin Firth) who is there with his wife. They have a an awkward and uncomfortable encounter. Bridget realizes that she cannot hang on to that failed relationship and goes with Miranda for a music festival weekend. While there she cute meets Jack (Patrick Dempsey) and gets it on while drunk and in the wrong tent. A few days later she runs into Darcy again at a christening and they are the godparents. He confesses he’s getting a divorce and still has a thing for her. So they get it on. A couple weeks later she realizes she’s pregnant and doesn’t know which one is the dad.

Somehow or other she has to tell each of her partners that they could possibly be the father of the child. But at first fails to tell them there may be someone else involved. When they find out about the other, there’s a bit of a competition for the parental rights. Both men are handsome and brilliant, and respect each other’s work but they are totally opposite in temperament. Jack is a computer dating mogul from America, and Darcy is a stalwart barrister. Bridget with the help of her eccentric friends, parents and amused gynecologist (Emma Thompson) all offer their support on discovering which man is the father.

While the sit-com type of story is somewhat formula, the cast rallies around the absurdity without getting too annoying. Getting Bridget to the hospital when she is in labor during a traffic jam is ridiculous, but laugh out loud funny. It's also a fantasy to have two successful handsome men at one's beck and call. And while we all pretty much know who she will eventually end up with, it’s just a nice time to get there.
(Review by reesa)




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Sunday, September 11, 2016

Movies Scheduled for the Week of September 11 - September 17


Hope everyone's life is settling down now that school is back and the selection of movies haven't hit the usual award worthy frenzy. AMC Northpark is cracking down on people in the lines, so just don't leave your chairs there and come back several hours later. They may not be there the next time. That first come first serve rule is seriously going to be enforced. We've had this problem in the past, then everyone started to slack off. Just a friendly reminder to make it fair for everyone.

Hey, if a contest pops up and the passes are gone in a flash, don't be so quick to ask people for their pass. There probably will be more contests showing up for that movie, so be patient and enter all the contests. If all else fails, which is pretty unlikely lately with so many partners offering passes, then and only then ask others to help. And folks, don't grab passes if you are not going to use them. Don't collect multiples if they are on same night. Just take the one you really want to see and release the others.

September 11 - September 17

Sunday September 11

Monday September 12

Tuesday September 13

Bridget Jones's Baby, 7:30 pm, AMC Northpark
The Exorcist TV Show, 7:30 pm, Angelika Dallas - Free soda and popcorn
The Blair Witch 8:00 pm, AMC Northpark

Wednesday September 14

Bridget Jones's Baby, 7:30 pm, Studio Movie Grill Royal
Snowden - 7:30 pm, Cinemark 17 and AMC Parks
The Blair Witch, 7:30 pm, Cinemark 17

Thursday September 15

Friday September 16

Saturday September 17





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Thursday, September 8, 2016

Sully




The team of actor Tom Hanks and director Clint Eastwood seems a sure bet for the coming awards season, especially with the based on tale of pilot Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger infamous landing of an USA Airways on the Hudson River in January 2009. Todd Komarnicki screenplay was adapted from Sullenberger’s memoir Highest Duty: My Search for What Really Matters with Jeffrey Zaslow. Sully’s remarkable landing of his cripple passenger jet in which everyone on board survived made him a national hero. As one character says “it’s been awhile since NYC had good news, especially with an airplane in it”.

Sully (Tom Hanks) in the aftermath of the landing, is plagued with nightmares of the possible different deadly scenarios that could have happened. He is put up in a local Marriott Hotel while the NTSB initiates an investigation. For some reason the panel of bureaucrats ( Jamey Sheridan, Mike O’Malley and Anna Gunn) seem intent on sticking holes into the “miracle on the Hudson”. According to their initial information and computer simulations, there is evidence that he could have made it back to the airport. They are the smirking bad guys of the story who insist that the left engine was not damaged and could have provided enough thrust to avoid the water “crash”. Or as Sully dutifully points out was a “landing”.

The story of what happened during the trip is told in a series of flashbacks from the perspective of various passengers, flight attendants, rescue crews, and random witnesses. Aaron Eckhart plays Jeff Skiles his co-pilot who with Sully read off the various pre-flight checklist. Even after the encounter with the birds shortly after take off, they remain calm and steady as they try and access the damage. They radio for assistance, but Sully has to make a quick decision of landing in the Hudson when all indicators say that getting to the airport would not work.

The media avalanche surrounds his home with wife Lorrie (Laura Linney whose role is limited to faceless conversations with Sully on the phone). She learns of the crash after Sully calls her when they are back on land and he tells her to turn on the TV. Everyone heralds Sully as the full fledged hero. Tom Hanks handles the role with a steady and humble forcefulness believing he was only doing what his 42 years of experience has taught him. Everywhere they go, people thank him, hug him and honor him as the hero. They even go on Letterman.

The actual crash is pretty exciting and the tense moments of getting the passengers out of the sinking aircraft are handled by the capable crew. The rescue by the ferry boats and NYPD scuba divers grabbing some passengers who had dove into the freezing waters in panic and Sully’s need to make sure that all 155 passengers and crew were all counted brings the viewer close to the remarkable event.

It’s been reported that real life investigators take umbrage at their portrayal of wanting to find fault with Sully’s landing on the water. But this is a kind of movie that needs a villain, and who else is better than suits for the government. Of course Sully is vindicated, and the movie ends with pictures of the real life participants of the event that will remain a great example of skill with a touch of miracle.
(Review by reesa)


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The Hollars




They popular theme of the dysfunctional family dynamic is a popular theme of many movies. It succeeds or fails depending on the cast and/or storyline which seems to be pretty much interchangeable for this genre.. This new film directed and produced by John Krasinski and written by James C. Strouse had it’s world premiere at Sundance. It’s a small film that is equally funny and annoying, saved only by the stellar performance of Margo Martindale.

Krasinski plays John, a graphic novelist living in NYC with his very pregnant girlfriend, Rebecca (Anna Kendrick). One day she goes to his office with his suitcase packed and a plane ticket because his father called to say his mother (Margo Martindale) is in the hospital. Returning to his home town is filled with a bit of nostalgia that is as usual not well met. His ex-long-time-girlfriend Gwen (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) is now married with child to another school mate Jason (Charlie Day) who just happens to be his mother’s nurse. Gwen is unsatisfied with her married life and throws herself on John, who confesses to Becca, who immediately goes to see John.

John is having some turpitude about making a more serious commitment to Becca even though they are soon to be parents. The heart to heart talks with his mother are the glue that keeps this film from being just another sit-com style of film. John’s brother, Ronnie (Sharlto Copley) has been fired by his dad (Richard Jenkins) from the family plumbing business. The business is teetering on bankruptcy and dad can’t get a loan or pay his employees. Ronnie is obsessed with his ex-wife by stalking her house so he can see his kids. His wife is now seeing a youth pastor Rev. Dan (Josh Grobin) who tries to mediate.

Krasinski’s sad sack face works well as the slightly confused and unconfident young man. Copley as the older brother is suffering from thinking he made the wrong choice of divorcing his wife. Crawling into the children's window at night is kinda creepy. Jenkins plays the crying mess of a husband. The parents are obviously devoted to each other, so it’s hard to understand why their kids are commitment phobic. Kendricks is kind of wasted as the understanding girlfriend having to be hugely pregnant on her tiny frame. Mom Sally’s advice to her son of “you won’t know until you get there, that’s it’s okay” is a bit of sage wisdom that seems to uplift what could have been a tear jerker ending. It’s a movie filled with light hearted and disconcerted moments, but in the long run, it’s okay.
(Review by reesa)


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Sunday, September 4, 2016

Movies Scheduled 9/4-9/10

Man we lost a legend this week. So I have told y'all I have been doing this movie screenings for a while. Well in 1989 when you had to go to radio stations events to pick up tickets I went to one and ended up getting tickets to see a movie in New York and go to a after party with the stars of the movie. The movie was See No Evil, Hear No Evil. Well Gene Wilder didn't show up since his wife just passed at the time but I still enjoyed the whole experience of going to a screening in New York!

If you have questions please email me at damitdaina@hotmail.com.


Sunday Sept. 4th


Monday Sept. 5th


Tuesday Sept. 6th


Wednesday Sept. 7th

Sully AMC Northpark
Bridget Jones's Baby AMC Firewheel


Thursday Sept. 8th


Friday Sept. 9th


Saturday Sept. 10th

Storks AMC's Northpark, Stonebriar and Firewheel


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Thursday, September 1, 2016

Morgan




Species and Ex Machina have a Very Average Love Child

Opening


Director Luke Scott is the son of Ridley Scott and this is his directorial debut. I am not a fan of nepotism but if you can deliver I will shut up. Did Luke follow in his father’s footsteps and is destined to become a legend? Was this Alien or was this The Counselor? Let’s get reel and break this down.

Plot

A corporate risk-management consultant must decide whether or not to terminate an artificially created humanoid being.

Directing/Writing

Pros

Luke definitely delivers and takes advantage of the isolated locations and action sequences given the small budget that was given. It’s an average debut but I can see glimpses of greatness and I am actually okay with Luke continuing to explore as a director.

Cons
The main issue with the story is the lack of emotional connection or weight to any of the characters. A lot of deaths occur and they feel extremely vapid and when the movie ends you question if you actually cared. With that, no one is really developed and feel one-dimensional, including the main character of Morgan, whom is the humanoid being. On top of all that, some characters come into the story and are gone as fast as they came on screen or are completely wasted.

Acting

Pros

To be honest, everyone is ok at best and I didn’t see any glowing or horrid areas with the performances. Everyone is serviceable. Paul Giamanti delivers the best performance? But his character also falls under one of the complainants from the section above.

Cons
None.

Cinematography

Pros

The isolated locations and atmosphere adds to the small amount of tension to the story and the cinematography contributes to that.

Cons
None.

Editing/Special Effects

Pros

With a runtime of 99 minutes, it does have a steady pace and you won’t spend too much time in the theater and has the intrigue of a good television movie so it should be a brisk watch.

Cons
The slow build up to the so-so climax might be a chore for some people because it does take a while to get going.

Overall
This isn’t the worst thing I have seen but it’s a serviceable debut and Luke can definitely grow from here. If you want an average escape this weekend this is your bet, but if not, you can definitely wait until it comes out available to rent.

Grade

C-

(Review by Chase Lee)





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Morris From America




Morris’s Raps Have a Strong Flow But He is Stuck in a Weak Rap Battle


Opening

A24 is releasing this? Say no more, I am on it. I trust this production’s company releases. I set aside a whole night to view this film, cancelled my plans, and isolated myself in my room. I am done watching the movie…eh, it’s fine. Let’s get reel and break this down.

Plot

The romantic and coming-of-age misadventures of a 13-year-old American living in Germany.

Directing/Writing

Pros

The intimacy between Morris and his father, played by Craig Robinson, are handled very well. The relationship these two characters have felt real and genuine. Every conversation dealt with growing up and finding your place in the world and really hitting on a relatable level while still providing flair and a bit of uniqueness to the coming-of-age subgenre.

Cons
Every scene that didn’t deal with Morris and his father, I didn’t care for. All the supporting characters felt more like a wrench in the story overall. There were even some characters introduced and didn’t really contribute much and maybe providing ten minutes of screen time. The weight of the story emotionally also hit as hard as I thought it would but has a nice comfortable ending.

Acting

Pros

Markees Christmas (awesome name btw) plays Morris and he had the charisma and likeability to carry the film and he was simply a joy to watch. Craig Robinson was wonderful and I hope he does smaller dramedies like this. I know this is a smaller movie that won’t get any recognition but I enjoyed Robinson’s performance a lot and thought he sunk into his character.

Cons
None.

Cinematography

Pros

The way its shot isn’t anything impressive but some unique angles and the colors provide a style that does make this one stick out. It provides the upbeat nature of the characters. Another film I can compare the look to would be Dope from last year.

Cons
None.

Editing/Special Effects

Pros

This is one of the shorter A24 releases clocking in at 90 minutes exactly, but with 10 minute credits it seems even shorter. It’s a nice adventure of a 13-year-old going throughout life and would be best on a rainy day.

Cons
None.

Overall
I wasn’t impressed with this but I do admire the relationship between Morris and his father, the performances between those two, and some of the scenes outside of that. But the power that coming-of-age films have is very average in this one.

Grade

C+

(Review by Chase Lee)




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