The Dallas Movie Screening Group

This is the homepage of the Dallas Movie Screening Group. To join our mailing list you must sign up at our group page on Yahoo. You will then be connected to receive notices on how to find passes to the local screenings in the DFW area. It's up to you to pickup or sign up for passes. You can also barter, trade or just giveaway passes you don't want, need or share with other members of the group. Please read the instructions on the Yahoo page very carefully before posting. This group is closely moderated so that your mail box is not full of spam or other unnecessary mail. We appreciate everyone's consideration and cooperation.

You can use this homepage for posting comments, reviews, and other things that cannot be posted to the group. Of course spam is not allowed. Thanks!

To join the Dallas Movie Screening Yahoo Group:
dallasmoviescreenings-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Reesa's Reviews can also be found at:
http://www.moviegeekfeed.com

Logo art by Steve Cruz http://www.mfagallery.com

Website and Group Contact: dalscreenings@gmail.com

Monday, July 22, 2019

This Week at the Alamo Drafthouse




Calling all movie lovers… Here’s what’s happening this week at Alamo Drafthouse DFW!

Take a trip back to 1969 in preparation for the 9th film from Quentin Tarantino with Hollywood 1969 - 4 classic films from the era that inspired ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD. Plus, see ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD in glorious 35mm at 3 Alamo Drafthouse locations in North Texas - Alamo Drafthouse Cedars, Alamo Drafthouse Richardson, and Alamo Drafthouse Las Colinas! And finally, the Video Vortex programming series brings you THE NEON SLIME MIXTAPE, one the greatest films you’ve never seen (since it was only ever released on VHS!). For a full calendar listing, please visit drafthouse.com/dfw/calendar.

See y’all soon at the Alamo Drafthouse!



This Week's Highlights…

July Series: Hollywood 1969
- Celebrate Quentin Tarantino’s upcoming ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD with 4 classic films from Hollywood 1969! This week’s films include TRUE GRIT at North Richland Hills, BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID at Las Colinas, and THE WILD BUNCH at Cedars.

ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD in 35mm!
- See this week’s new release, the 9th film from filmmaker Quentin Tarantino, in glorious 35mm at Alamo Drafthouse Cedars, Alamo Drafthouse Richardson, and Alamo Drafthouse Las Colinas!

Video Vortex - monthly series

- Video Vortex unearths ultra-obscure, ultra-bizarre movies that were only released (or never released!) on home video. Every movie is curated to potentially be the greatest thing you’ve never seen! Here’s your chance to see The Neon Slime Mixtape this week at Denton, Richardson, and Lake Highlands!


MONDAY | JULY 22

Cedars
Screening: Kids Camp: Madagascar at 10:00AM
Screening: UHF Movie Party at 6:50PM

Denton
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 9:50AM
Screening: Strange Things: Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure at 6:30PM

Lake Highlands
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 9:50AM
Screening: Strange Things: Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure at 6:45PM
Screening: Cream Of The Cult: The Cook, The Thief, His Wife, And Her Lover at 9:20PM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Vetted Well at 8:00PM

Las Colinas
Screening: Kids Camp: Kung Fu Panda at 10:00AM
Screening: Strange Things: Weird Science at 7:00PM

North Richland Hills
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 10:00AM
Screening: Strange Things: Mad Max Beyond Thuderdome at 7:00PM

Richardson
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 10:10AM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Glass Half Full at 8:00PM



TUESDAY | JULY 23

Cedars
Screening: Kids Camp: Madagascar at 10:00AM
Screening: The Blair Witch Project at 6:50PM

Denton
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 9:50AM
Screening: Video Vortex: The Neon Slime Mixtape at 8:55PM

Lake Highlands
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 9:50AM
Screening: Jaws Movie Party at 6:50PM
Screening: Video Vortex: The Neon Slime Mixtape at 9:20PM

Las Colinas
Screening: Kids Camp: Kung Fu Panda at 10:00AM
Screening: Hollywood 1969: Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid at 7:00PM

North Richland Hills
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 10:00AM
Screening: The Blair Witch Project at 7:00PM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Glass Half Full at 8:00PM

Richardson
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 10:10AM
Screening: Hopped Up Cinema: True Lies (on 35mm) with Lakewood Brewing at 7:30PM
Screening: Video Vortex: The Neon Slime Mixtape at 9:00PM
Bar Event: Tiki Bingo - Glass Half Full at 7:00PM



WEDNESDAY | JULY 24

All Locations: Teacher Appreciation Wednesdays: a FREE movie ticket for teachers and school faculty/staff at screenings that start before 5:00pm. Teacher-themed special menu available ALL DAY for everyone!

Cedars
Screening: Kids Camp: Madagascar at 10:00AM
Screening: Hollywood 1969: The Wild Bunch at 6:30PM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Vetted Well at 8:00PM

Denton
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 9:50AM
Screening: UHF Movie Party at 6:50PM

Lake Highlands
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 9:50AM

Las Colinas
Screening: Kids Camp: Kung Fu Panda at 10:00AM
Screening: Drop Dead Gorgeous at 6:30PM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Vetted Well at 8:00PM

North Richland Hills
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 10:00AM
Screening: Movie Party: Purple Rain at 7:00PM

Richardson
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 10:10AM
Screening: UHF Movie Party at 6:50PM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Glass Half Full at 8:00PM



THURSDAY | JULY 25
Cedars
Screening: Kids Camp: Madagascar at 10:00AM

Denton
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 10:00AM

Lake Highlands
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 10:00AM

Las Colinas
Screening: Kids Camp: Kung Fu Panda at 9:55AM

North Richland Hills
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 10:00AM

Richardson
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 10:00AM



FRIDAY | JULY 26
Cedars
Screening: Kids Camp: Madagascar at 9:50AM

Denton
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 10:00AM

Lake Highlands
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 10:00AM

Las Colinas
Screening: Kids Camp: Kung Fu Panda at 10:00AM
Screening: Cinema With The Snake: Once Upon A Time In Hollywood at 8:00PM

North Richland Hills
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 10:00AM

Richardson
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 10:10AM
Screening: Dread Presents Assassinaut at 9:00PM



SATURDAY | JULY 27
Cedars
Screening: PBS Kids at the Alamo: Wild Kratts Alaska: Hero’s Journey at 10:00AM

Denton
Screening: PBS Kids at the Alamo: Wild Kratts Alaska: Hero’s Journey at 10:00AM
Screening: Hollywood 1969: The Wild Bunch at 6:30PM

Lake Highlands
Screening: Dallas Child Presents: The Secret Life Of Pets Cereal Party at 10:10AM

Las Colinas
Screening: PBS Kids at the Alamo: Wild Kratts Alaska: Hero’s Journey at 10:00AM

North Richland Hills
Screening: PBS Kids at the Alamo: Wild Kratts Alaska: Hero’s Journey at 10:00AM
Screening: Hollywood 1969: Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid at 12:45PM

Richardson
Screening: PBS Kids at the Alamo: Wild Kratts Alaska: Hero’s Journey at 10:10AM
Screening: Master Pancake: Keanu-Thon at 7:30PM



SUNDAY | JULY 28
Cedars
Screening: PBS Kids at the Alamo: Wild Kratts Alaska: Hero’s Journey at 9:50AM
Screening: The Last Starfighter at 7:30PM

Denton
Screening: PBS Kids at the Alamo: Wild Kratts Alaska: Hero’s Journey at 10:00AM
Screening: The Last Starfighter at 6:30PM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Vetted Well at 7:00PM

Las Colinas
Screening: PBS Kids at the Alamo: Wild Kratts Alaska: Hero’s Journey at 10:00AM

North Richland Hills
Screening: PBS Kids at the Alamo: Wild Kratts Alaska: Hero’s Journey at 10:00AM
Screening: Hollywood 1969: True Grit at 12:45PM

Richardson
Screening: PBS Kids at the Alamo: Wild Kratts Alaska: Hero’s Journey at 10:10AM
Screening: Eyes Wide Shut at 9:00PM



First Run Movies Now Playing...
Crawl
Midsommar
Spider-Man: Far From Home
Stuber
The Art Of Self Defense
The Lion King
Toy Story 4
Yesterday

Premiering This Week...

Once Upon A Time In Hollywood
Once Upon A Time In Hollywood (in 35mm)

Stay Connected...

Facebook: facebook.com/AlamoDrafthouseDFW
Twitter: twitter.com/AlamoDFW
Instagram: instagram.com/alamodfw
Website: drafthouse.com/dfw
Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | www.drafthouse.com





Bookmark and Share

Anime-Zing Monthly Series Launches at the Alamo Drafthouse






ANIME-ZING – A NEW MONTHLY SERIES DEVOTED TO ANIME LAUNCHES AT ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE IN AUGUST

Anime delivers a colorful world of giant robots, giggling wizards, and post-apocalyptic death machines – but it's also so much more. Beginning in August, Alamo Drafthouse will bring the best of the Japanese artform back to the big screen with ANIME-ZING, a new monthly programming series. ANIME-ZING is dedicated to sharing the wonders of anime with everyone – die-hard enthusiasts and those just curious to see what all the hype is about.

Starting with titles like NINJA SCROLL, MILLENNIUM ACTRESS and VAMPIRE HUNTER D, ANIME-ZING takes a deep dive into the amazing archive of Japanese animation, from the genre-soaked universe of science fiction and fantasy to the emotionally rich dramas about the world right outside our window.

Get tickets to NINJA SCROLL here, or check out the official ANIME-ZING series page for more info and upcoming shows.
###

Alamo Drafthouse DFW links

Facebook: facebook.com/AlamoDrafthouseDFW
Twitter: twitter.com/AlamoDFW
Instagram: instagram.com/alamodfw
Website: drafthouse.com/dfw


About Alamo Drafthouse
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema was founded in 1997 as a single-screen mom and pop repertory theater in Austin, TX. Twenty-two years later, with 40 locations and counting, Alamo Drafthouse has been called "the best theater in America" by Entertainment Weekly and "the best theater in the world" by Wired. Alamo Drafthouse has built a reputation as a movie lover's oasis not only by combining food and drink service with the movie-going experience, but also introducing unique programming and high-profile, star-studded special events. Alamo Drafthouse created Fantastic Fest, a world renowned film festival dubbed "The Geek Telluride" by Variety. Fantastic Fest showcases eight days of genre cinema from independents, international filmmakers and major Hollywood studios. Alamo Drafthouse's collectible art gallery, Mondo, offers breathtaking, original products featuring designs from world-famous artists based on licenses for popular TV and Movie properties including Star Wars, Star Trek & Universal Monsters. Alamo Drafthouse continues to expand its brand in new and exciting ways, including Birth.Movies.Death., an entertainment content platform for movie lovers, and the American Genre Film Archive, a nonprofit film archive dedicated to preserving, restoring and sharing film.




Bookmark and Share

Sunday, July 21, 2019

AFFD2019 - Missbehavior





In his film “Missbehavior,” writer / director Ho-Cheung Pang takes a single-minded theme for his movie’s ribald humor, building his movie off of a paper-thin concept – the quest for a bottle of breast milk. “Missbehavior” is a feature that’s more interested in relishing in its ridiculousness without thinking whether it should. It quickly places itself in the gutter and stays there.



The film gets its start when, following a cheeky seventies era title sequence, a policewoman (Gigi Leung) is confronted by her estranged friend (Isabel Chan) who begins to tell of the recent woes of their friend June (June Lam). When June’s boss, Luna Fu (Isabella Leung), asked her to make a cup of coffee for a prospective client, a miscommunication led June to make the coffee using Fu’s own refrigerated breast milk instead of the office’s low-fat milk. Fu’s breast milk is in the company refrigerator in a generic glass bottle with the letters “LF” taped on it. Maybe this is a cultural barrier but Fu’s bottle of milk looks nothing like a bottle you’d expect to find in a store, especially with its hand-written label, making the film’s premise one that’s already highly implausible. Leung and Chan’s characters start a crusade to bring their group of friends, now only held together by an internet chat group calling themselves “the bitches,” together to help June get a bottle of the precious liquid before her boss goes home for the day.



It’s possible to make an excellent film out of a ludicrous premise but “Missbehavior” doesn’t even come close to being a passable one. Jokes fall flat, again perhaps due to cultural barriers, without a single one of the ensuing shenanigans causing even a slight smirk (it’s probably a good idea to note that there were multiple walk-outs during this screening).



“Missbehavior” is driven by its own misguided manic energy. It opens with a nauseously quick-paced editing style that never lets up as it quickly introduces the lead group of characters and begins to flesh out the quarrels within the group. Since so many characters are introduced at once, it can be a bit hard to decipher who is who throughout the film’s opening act. Once the movie settles into its groove (for better or worse – in my taste worse) and established its characters, it’s easier to identify and keep up with who’s who.



Pang keeps his film rolling with increasingly absurd episodes ranging from breaking-and-entering (in bright blue bodysuits) to posing as a fictional non-profit organization outside the breast-feeding room in a mall. There’s even an aside in one of the movie’s vignette-like scenarios about one of the women having to poop in a restroom in the elementary school, putting the film’s frequent potty-driven humor in the spotlight. Within each episode, strung together via a connecting device featuring a cityscape broken up with shots of the group, Pang enters into dramatic territory working to resolve the issues that have arisen within this group of friends.



“Missbehavior” is sure to be divisive with it’s over-the-top and often juvenile humor, though I suspect most will not find this one in the slightest bit enjoyable.
(Review by Bret Oswald)





Bookmark and Share

AFFD2019 - Youngju





After the sudden death of her parents, Youngju (Kim Hyang-Gi) has her childhood stolen away, left with the care of her younger brother Youngin (Tang Jun-Sang). Five years later, the siblings living situation has only worsened. Youngju is now on the cusp of turning twenty, entering into adulthood with no degree and no career prospects – she works stocking shelves. Her aunt (Chang Hyae-Jin), who was left with the fiscal responsibilities of Youngju’s parents (their debt and paying for the care of their children), wants Youngju to sell their apartment. Desperate to hold on to their home, Youngju denies her aunt’s demand but finances are on the verge of evaporating and trouble soon arises.



Writer / director Cha Sung-Duk’s debut feature “Youngju,” titled after it’s lead character, is a melancholic story about loss, its effects, and finding comfort (and maybe forgiveness) in surprising places. Youngin falls in with the wrong crowd and gets himself into legal trouble. Now in need of money to keep Youngin from being locked up and having burned bridges with her aunt, Youngju decides to confront the man responsible for her parents’ deaths in hopes of demanding money from him to help with her financial woes.



Her search leads her to the workplace, a small shop selling tofu, of Sang-Moon (Yoo Jae-Myeong) and his wife Hyang-Sook (Kim Ho-Jung). Without telling them who she is, Youngju starts working for the couple. But instead of fulfilling her initial desire for revenge, Youngju finds herself sucked into the lives of the troubled couple, who have had their own share of dilemmas and set-backs due to the accident caused by Sang-Moon.



“Youngju” is a character driven film, a movie more focused on exploring its characters’ emotions and their interactions with each other. Sung-Duk doesn’t present Sang-Moon as someone to be reviled (or even to pity). He’s just an everyday man on the street who had an accident that, unfortunately had long-lasting, devastating ramifications. Sung-Duk keeps the story simple, keeping the film dramatic without delving into soap-opera like melodrama.



The actors do a fine job in their respective roles. Kim Ho-Jung fares the best of the lead cast. She does a fantastic job of portraying the nurturing wife of Sang-Moon, attaching herself to Youngju in lieu of her own child. The other roles feel fairly typical for this type of film. The performances work in context of the movie but none of the actors, other than Ho-Jung, really stood-out.



Like the acting, the cinematography doesn’t offer up much of note. Again, like the acting, it’s typical for this type of film. The camera’s often unsteady, bobbing around slightly instead of keeping a steady shot. It also works in context of the movie but doesn’t leave the audience with any memorable imagery.



Sung-Duk draws the story to an emotional charged climax that, unfortunately, overstays its welcome. The point is made but instead of moving on and closing out the film, Sung-Duk lingers for an extended period of time on his subject. What could have been a satisfying conclusion to this quiet story is dragged out to nearly unbearable lengths. It gets its point across but leaves the audience to stew in it, a decision that may cause some viewers to leave with feelings of frustration rather than release.



Worthy of checking out if you are into emotionally and character-driven dramas. Otherwise, it’s probably better to seek out another film to view.
(Review by Bret Oswald)



Bookmark and Share

Movies Scheduled for the Week of Jul 21 - Jul 27


Hot enuff for y'all out there. We still have to endure August and September. It's very cool viewing at the Angelika this week with the Asian Film Festival Dallas with their amazing slate of curated films that let you glimpse into a countries, landscapes, people and stories that you can't find anywhere else. Festival ends on Thursday. Don't miss out!

I know everyone wants to get passes to the Hollywood screening next week. And the folks that won passes will most likely be using theirs. Asking people to give them up to you when there are contests still pending... Enter them.

Jul 21 - Jul 27

Mon - Jul 22

Earth X: Into the Canyon - 7:00 pm - Angelika Dallas
This Changes Everything - 7:00 pm - Various DFW locations

Tue - Jul 23

Brian Banks - 6:30 pm - AMC Northpark
Once Upon a Time in Hollywood - 7:00 pm - Alamo Richardson

Wed - Jul 24

Farewell - 7:00 pm - AMC Northpark
Good Boys - 7:30 pm - Angelika






Bookmark and Share

Thursday, July 18, 2019

This Changes Everything







(Review by Chase Lee)



Bookmark and Share

Stuber





The film Stuber showcases Kumail Nanjiani as a rather chill easy-going Uber driver ( Stu) whole by chance becones caught up in a rather bloody and violent police/ criminal car chase across LA, tracking a really bad drug dealer.

LAPD detective Vic Manning (Dave Bautista) hires Stu when his car is destroyed because he wrecked it while trying to drive after LASIX surgery against Dr orders. Both are a study in personality contrasts and intensity levels, especially because Stu is desperately trying to make a good impression and earn a coveted five star passenger rating, after several rides hilariously leave him with one star or worse ratings. Vic is extremely desperate and blindly driven in getting this guy, who escaped him many years earlier.

Stu and his fastidiously maintained Uber car find themselves in for the ride and experience of their lives. Stu isn't exactly the bravest branch on the tree, a rather innocent and peace living guy. We are often pleasantly entertained by his shocked and panicked reactions as things unfold in an odd combination of violence and comedy.

Be forewarned. The film is quite violent. Sometimes it makes sense and sometimes it just feels off. A few innocent bystanders are taken out in the process of the pursuit and that's just frustrating. Evil drug dealers you know. The casting is all there and they do the best they can with a rather predictable story line. It is certainly amusing in parts.

Happily, Mira Sorvino makes a return to the screen but her talents seem somewhat wasted. Joining her are Betty Gilpin and Karen Gillan in additional minor roles. One being the friend/ hook up Stu has been trying to get to all day and night long as he begins to realize he's going to be busy driving and ultimately aiding Vic until his goal is realized. No matter how long it takes.

Opinions appear mixed. Critics are not enthused but audiences are throwing their interest into this pairing.
(Review by Cheryl Wurtz)






Bookmark and Share

Wednesday, July 17, 2019

Farewell






Writer/director Lulu Wang shared the story of her grandmother's illness on This American Life. Wang expanded it into a semi-autobiographical feature film that will linger in your heart for a long time to come as it addresses the nature of immigrants dealing with two cultures. Starring rapper and actress Awkwafina (a.k.a. Nora Lum) who was the scene stealer in Crazy Rich Asians plays Billi whose parents brought her to the U.S. as a child. The film premiered in the U.S. Dramatic Competition section at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival.

The beginning of the film declares that the story is "based on an actual lie". Billi discovers that her beloved grandmother Nai Nai (Zhao Shuzhen) has been diagnosed with lung cancer and only has a few months to live. Apparently it is common in families not to tell the sick person they are going to die, so her parents (Tzi Ma and Diana Lin) didn't tell Billi that they were going back to China because Billi who wears her heart on her sleeve would not be able to keep the secret. Billi goes anyways. The pretext of the whole family visiting is her paternal cousin is getting married to his Japanese girlfriend of only a three months. Her Nai Nai is thrilled for the reunion and is organizing a huge wedding party wanting lobster but can only get crab. Nai Nai is a force in which her two sons, their wives and children, various aunts and uncles revolve.

One would think such a somber subject would be a tearjerker. It is, but in a good way. Wang immerses the viewer into the personal dynamics of the family. The universality of family gatherings especially when dealing with those who left for another country versus those who stayed is quite understandable even if it's just people who moved to another city coming back to the homestead. You may not see them for years, but you step into the same rhythm enjoying the differences. Plus it's the big dinners when the family gathers and everyone is talking, catching up with their lives. Food is the translator woven together with love. Billi can't seem to stop the tears pooling in her eyes thinking that she is losing her grandmother who she calls fairly often from New York. But she manages to keep the information inside while enjoying each and every minute she can share with her Nai Nai. Awkwafina shows that she is more than a comedic distraction in a plot. She makes us remember it's important to appreciate one's family ties and hug the one your with.
(Review by reesa)





Bookmark and Share

Sunday, July 14, 2019

Movies Scheduled for the Week of Jul 14 - Jul 20



If you haven't noticed, the Asian Film Festival of Dallas is starting this week at the Angelika Dallas. Seeing as our usual promo's for the week aren't popping, you should check out the AFFD programming which offers some interesting selections that you don't often see at your local theaterplex. Check them out at www.asianfilmdallas.com

Jul 14 - Jul 20

Tues - Jul 16

Farewell - 7:00 pm - Angelika

Thu - Jul 18

Pennyworth - 7:30 pm - Angelika





Bookmark and Share
che

Thursday, July 11, 2019

Kanarie






“Kanarie” (“Canary” in English) takes place in mid-1980s South Africa during Apartheid (a fact that viewers will either know or not know at the film’s start). Writer/director Christiaan Olwagen and his co-writer Charl-Johan Lingenfelder don’t mention anything related to the country’s history as the movie starts, allowing viewers to become aware of South Africa’s social/political climate through the eyes of the film’s lead character Johan (Schalk Bezuidenhout).

Johan is a high school student living with his parents in a small town. On a dare from two friends (both female), Johan walks down the street wearing a wedding dress. Out on the street, the dress’s veil covering Johan’s face, Olwagen shifts the characters into a fantasy dance number featuring Bronski Beat’s “Smalltown Boy,” a seemingly odd choice given that Bezuidenhout is made up to look like Boy George – Johan’s obsession/idol – during the scene. This sequence sets the tone for a movie that doesn’t follow. Shortly after this dare, Johan is drafted into the army. Attempting to make his service more palatable, he auditions for (and is accepted to) the South African Defence Force Choir and Concert Group, a small choir within the army whose 23 members are known as Kanaries.

Armed with his collection of records, Johan heads to training. On the train, he meets Ludolf (Germandt Geldenhuys), a fellow member of the Kanaries. The closeted Johan is off put by the behavior of the effeminate Ludolf, whose antics he worries will draw unwanted attention. At training, he finds a kindred spirit in Wolfgang (Hannes Otto), who shares his taste in music. Under the direction of Reverend Engelbrecht (Jacques Bessenger), the boys begin to practice for their eventual concert tour. The terror of discovery and its repercussions in a time and country where homosexuality is a punishable crime mount on top of the stress of military service requiring Johan to come to terms with himself.

Olwagen chooses to film the movie with mostly long takes, creating a visual and rhythmic disparity to the inner stress put upon the film’s characters. The soundtrack, mostly made up of religious hymns heard during the rehearsals and performances of the choir, is serene, aurally complimenting the film’s imagery. The camera at times languishes as if attempting to capture still photographs. A technique first used as the boys get their haircut and later used when they are at the border. The early sequence fits within the movie but the later one feels slightly disjointed, showing images of violence amongst its portraits when the exact purpose of the youth’s enlistment hasn’t been made entirely clear.

Performances are fine with Bezuidenhout, Otto, and Geldenhuys standing-out among the cast. Their on-screen relationship with each other helps to make their characters feel real. Bezuidenhout makes Johan’s insecurities apparent in contrast to the self-assuredness displayed by Otto and Geldenhuys.

Olwagen’s film is advertised as a coming-of-age war musical. The only questionable part of this description is the word “musical.” Yes, there is singing in Olwagen’s movie but it isn’t included in a way (besides the opening scene and a sequence that takes place in a night club) that makes one think of a musical.

There are pacing issues (some scenes go on just a bit too long) but, as a whole, Olwagen’s film works. “Kanarie” is an intriguing coming-of-age film, using a backdrop quite different than what’s usually seen in the genre.

On DVD and Video on Demand on June 18.
(Review by Bret Oswald)





Bookmark and Share

Maiden






Through the use of archive footage and one-on-one interviews, director Alex Holmes tells the story of Tracy Edwards, her crew, and her ship Maiden. Edwards name, perhaps not instantly recognizable to most potential viewers, is famous in the world of competitive sailing for being the skipper of the first ever all-female crew to compete in the Whitbread Round the World Race.

“Maiden,” the name of her boat taken for the title of this documentary, begins with Holmes briefly chronicling Edwards’ early life. Holmes, using voice-over taken from his own interviews with Edwards, tells of her happy early childhood before revealing that it abruptly ended with the sudden death of her father. Her mother, unable to keep her husband’s business running, eventually decided to remarry. Unfortunately, her stepfather turned out to be an abusive alcoholic, which caused Edwards to grow into an angry and rebellious teenager and resulted in her running away from home.

Edwards found solace among the misfits and burn-outs found in the boating crews around island resorts. In 1985, she managed to get a role as cook (the only position she could get in the male-dominated sport of sailing) for a crew entering the fourth Whitbread Round the World Race. Her time on the crew, which she spent learning and absorbing as much as she could, led to the fruition of an idea – entering an all-female crew in the next Whitbread Round the World Race, which competes every three years.

What’s obvious to modern audiences, since this is a documentary, and we are watching interviews with all of the crew members, wasn’t so obvious to the world in the late-80s. Holmes’s documentary spends the majority of its length telling of Edwards’ willpower and determination in getting herself and her crew into the race. She struggled with funding, acquiring a boat, and getting a crew ready for a grueling, nearly year-long, water-bound race.

Edwards’ crew didn’t follow the trajectory many journalists and sports fans anticipated. They expected the group of women to be irritable and moody, incapable of working together or even completing the first leg of the race. Instead, Edwards and her crew revealed themselves to be a unified team more than capable of competing among the best in the unforgiving ocean waters.

The archival footage is rough looking. However, while the footage isn’t as visually appealing as modern audiences have come to expect, it’s more than adequate to give viewers a sense of what these women went through. This footage, in combination with the interviews conducted by Holmes, tells a compelling story. Editor Katie Bryer arranges the footage, both new and old, into a well-organized narrative. Unlike some documentaries which take a stream-of-consciousness approach to their topics, subjects are only introduced as they become relevant (and vanish when they become irrelevant) to the story. Although the documentary is a little dry at times, it manages to remain intriguing thanks to the passion these women show, even thirty years after the event, for their time preparing for and competing in the Whitbread Race Round the World.

There are some elements of the race that Holmes could have explained better. When your purpose is to inform, it’s best to assume your viewers know nothing. It’s mentioned that the boats are divided into classes but never made entirely clear how many are in each class. At one point, it’s stated that Maiden came in third place on one of the six legs of the competition (the leg aspect is mostly made clear by Holmes) but never clarified if this was last place or if other boats came in behind them. The mechanics of the race aren’t clearly communicated to viewers either. Is there a specific course each boat must take from point A to point B? Holmes also never specifies how long they are given a land furlough before returning to sea. A count of days at sea is also shown throughout that is a bit misleading since it doesn’t start over after they’ve had a period on dry land.

Nonetheless, “Maiden” is an intriguing and inspiring documentary about hard-work and determination.
(Review by Bret Oswald)





Bookmark and Share

Stuber






(Review by Chase Lee)




Bookmark and Share

Monday, July 8, 2019

This Week at the Alamo Drafthouse





Calling all movie lovers… Here’s what’s happening this week at Alamo Drafthouse DFW!

Alamo DFW presents 2 exciting programming series this month - Strange Things and Hollywood 1969. Strange Things invites you to take a trip back to 1985 with 5 films that were released in July 1985, and journey even further back with Hollywood 1969 and catch 4 classic films from the era that inspired ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD. Plus, just when you thought it was safe to go back into the theater, Alamo Drafthouse DFW presents the JAWS Movie Party! For a full calendar listing, please visit drafthouse.com/dfw/calendar.

See y’all at the Alamo Drafthouse!




This Week's Highlights…


July Series: Strange Things
- In celebration of the release of STRANGER THINGS Season 3, Alamo Drafthouse DFW's presents the return of the Strange Things programming series! Flashback to the ‘80s and relive July 1985 with five hits released that month. This week’s films include MAD MAX BEYOND THUNDERDOME at Lake Highlands and Denton, BACK TO THE FUTURE at Las Colinas, and PEE-WEE’S BIG ADVENTURE at North Richland Hills.

July Series: Hollywood 1969
- This July, celebrate Quentin Tarantino’s upcoming ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD with 4 classic films from Hollywood 1969! This week’s films include TRUE GRIT at Cedars and Denton, BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID at Denton, and THE WILD BUNCH at Richardson and North Richland Hills.

JAWS Movie Party at Cedars, Richardson, North Richland Hills and Denton
- It’s the most fourth-wall busting-fun you can have on dry land as JAWS gets the Movie Party treatment with interactive props and surprises at each screening!


MONDAY | JULY 8

Cedars
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 10:00AM
Screening: Jaws Movie Party at 7:00PM

Denton
Screening: Kids Camp: Madagascar at 10:00AM
Screening: Strange Things: Mad Max Beyond Thuderdome at 6:50PM

Lake Highlands
Screening: Kids Camp: Kung Fu Panda at 10:00AM
Screening: Strange Things: Mad Max Beyond Thuderdome at 7:00PM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Vetted Well at 8:00PM

Las Colinas
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 10:00AM
Screening: Strange Things: Back To The Future at 7:15PM

North Richland Hills
Screening: Strange Things: Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure at 7:00PM
Screening: Kids Camp: Kung Fu Panda at 10:00AM

Richardson
Screening: Kids Camp: Madagascar at 10:00AM
Screening: Hollywood 1969: The Wild Bunch at 6:30PM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Glass Half Full at 8:00PM



TUESDAY | JULY 9

Cedars
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 10:00AM
Screening: Fist City: To Live And Die In L.A. at 7:00PM

Denton
Screening: Kids Camp: Madagascar at 10:00AM
Screening: Piranha (1978) at 6:50PM

Lake Highlands
Screening: Kids Camp: Kung Fu Panda at 10:00AM
Screening: UHF Movie Party at 7:00PM

Las Colinas
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 9:55AM
Screening: The Last Starfighter at 7:15PM

North Richland Hills
Screening: Kids Camp: Kung Fu Panda at 10:00AM
Screening: Video Vortex: The Neon Slime Mixtape at 8:30PM

Richardson
Screening: Kids Camp: Madagascar at 10:00AM
Bar Event: Tiki Bingo - Glass Half Full at 7:00PM



WEDNESDAY | JULY 10

All Locations: Teacher Appreciation Wednesdays: a FREE movie ticket for teachers and school faculty/staff at screenings that start before 5:00pm. Teacher-themed special menu available ALL DAY for everyone!

Cedars
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 10:00AM
Screening: Hollywood 1969: True Grit at 7:40PM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Vetted Well at 8:00PM

Denton
Screening: Kids Camp: Madagascar at 10:00AM
Screening: Jaws Movie Party at 6:55PM

Lake Highlands
Screening: Kids Camp: Kung Fu Panda at 10:00AM
Screening: Kung Fu Jungle: Snake In The Eagle’s Shadow (1978) at 7:00PM

Las Colinas
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 9:55AM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Vetted Well at 8:00PM

North Richland Hills
Screening: Kids Camp: Kung Fu Panda at 10:00AM
Screening: Jaws Movie Party at 7:00PM

Richardson
Screening: Kids Camp: Madagascar at 10:00AM
Screening: Jaws Movie Party at 6:50PM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Glass Half Full at 8:00PM



THURSDAY | JULY 11

Cedars
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 10:00AM

Denton
Screening: Kids Camp: Madagascar at 10:00AM

Lake Highlands
Screening: Kids Camp: Kung Fu Panda at 10:00AM

Las Colinas
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 9:55AM

North Richland Hills
Screening: Kids Camp: Kung Fu Panda at 10:00AM

Richardson
Screening: Kids Camp: Madagascar at 10:00AM



FRIDAY | JULY 12

Cedars
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 10:00AM

Denton
Screening: Kids Camp: Madagascar at 10:00AM
Screening: Hollywood 1969: Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid at 7:00PM

Lake Highlands
Screening: Kids Camp: Kung Fu Panda at 10:00AM

Las Colinas
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 10:00AM

North Richland Hills
Screening: Kids Camp: Kung Fu Panda at 10:00AM

Richardson
Screening: Kids Camp: Madagascar at 10:00AM
Screening: Piranha (1978) at 12:45PM



SATURDAY | JULY 13
Cedars
Screening: KUUMBA Presents Bad Luck Joe at 7:30PM

Denton
Screening: KUUMBA Presents Bad Luck Joe at 9:15PM
Screening: Rocky Horror Picture Show w/ Los Bastardos Shadow Cast at 10:00PM

Lake Highlands
Screening: PBS Kids at the Alamo: Wild Kratts Alaska: Hero’s Journey at 10:00AM
Screening: Champagne Cinema: When Harry Met Sally at 6:45PM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink Brunch - Vetted Well at 2:00PM

North Richland Hills
Screening: Ft. Worth Child: Minions Cereal Party at 10:00AM
Screening: Hollywood 1969: The Wild Bunch at 12:45PM

Richardson
Screening:


SUNDAY | JULY 14

Cedars
Screening: Dallas Child: Secret Life Of Pets Cereal Party at 10:00AM

Denton
Screening: North Texas Child: Sing Cereal Party a 10:00AM
Screening: Hollywood 1969: True Grit at 12:30PM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Vetted Well at 7:00PM

Lake Highlands
Screening: PBS Kids at the Alamo: Wild Kratts Alaska: Hero’s Journey at 10:00AM

Las Colinas
Screening: Jaws Movie Party at 4:00PM

Richardson
Screening: The Last Starfighter at 12:45PM
Screening: BONDthology: Quantum Of Solace (2008) at 7:00PM



First Run Movies Now Playing...

Aladdin (2019)
Annabelle Comes Home
Avengers: Endgame Re-Release
Spider-Man: Far From Home
Toy Story 4
Yesterday

Premiering This Week...

The Art Of Self Defense


Stay Connected...
www.drafthouse.com/dfw
www.facebook.com/alamodrafthousedfw
www.twitter.com/alamodfw
www.instagram.com/alamodfw
Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | www.drafthouse.com




Bookmark and Share

Sunday, July 7, 2019

Movies Scheduled for the Week of Jul 7 - Jul 13


Did you all have a great 4th of July? Didn't get a chance to check out real fireworks up close and personal since once more my car is down for the count. Plus it's not safe to venture out when foolish folks are shooting guns in the air. Don't people realize that what goes up...comes down?

Not too many movies this week. But do y'all know the Asian Film Festival of Dallas will be featuring some really great films as usual. Films that you probably would not be able to see any where else especially the major theaters that just show blockbusters. If you have time please come to the volunteer orientation Monday night at the Angelika and show support from our movie community.

July 7 - July 13

Mon - Jul 8

The Girl Who Believed in Miracles - 7:00 pm - Cinemark Legacy Plano
AFFD Volunteer Orientation - 7:00 pm - Angelika

Wed - Jul 10

Stuber - 7:00 pm - Harkins Southlake
Good Boys - 7:30 pm - Studio Movie Grill Northwest Hwy.





Bookmark and Share

Monday, July 1, 2019

Spiderman Far From Home





Director: Jon Watts Studio: Sony/Columbia Pictures

“MCU’s Spider-Man: Far From Home becomes the closing door to Phase Three.”

Marvel Studios have much more commitment and integrity on releasing two-to-three films per year, earning as much revenue from the box-office.

While Far From Home supposed to serve as the first of the Phase Four, it became the official conclusion of Phase 3 according to Marvel Studios President Kevin Feige. While the setting of the film takes after Avengers: Endgame, Spider-Man: Far From Home gets another drive with Peter Parker’s super-suit for a new role after Tony Stark. Please be warned that if you haven’t seen Avengers: Endgame yet, then do not watch Spider-Man: Far From Home nor read the reviews from the film if you want to avoid any spoilers from Avengers: Endgame.

In the film, Peter (Tom Holland), now 16 years old is travelling to Europe with his classmates on a summer class trip where he has a chance to woo Michelle "MJ" Jones (portrayed by Zendaya). However, he is then recruited by Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) and Quentin Beck/Mysterio (portrayed by Jake Gyllenhaal) to battle the Elementals who are attacking parts of Europe.

Parts of the cast, including Marisa Tomei, from Spider-Man: Homecoming returned with Samuel L. Jackson and Cobie Smulders appeared as supporting characters and Parker’s mentors after Tony Stark. Jake Gyllenhaal also joins in as Quentin Beck/Mysterio, setting up a slow, gentle chemistry between him and Holland, a reminiscent of Spider-Man’s relationship with Tony Stark/Iron Man.

Jon Watts returns to the director’s chair of helming his second Spider-Man film. He did not just rehash the Peter Parker’s sticky-web flying techniques, but this time, he teach the character about the basic life as an ordinary human being and not focusing on Spider-Man ego too much, a recall from Tony Stark’s words from Homecoming. Watts, taking much influence from the original Spider-Man trilogy and The Amazing Spider-Man reboots, keeps his steady focus on character developments and less-messier, but meatier outlooks to both Spider-Man, Nick Fury, and Mysterio based on how he did with other heroic and villainy characters in Homecoming.

The styles, action sequences, and the battle scenes are all done by series of humongous FX creatures and strong visual-effects that serve as main element for the entire film, the plot twist, new outlooks for the actions sequences, and the Jake Gyllenhaal ‘s Mysterio character. The FX consumption and the massive usages of visual effects are bit too much that would make the movie to earn piles of money and they really bring up the whole spidey-thing down to the ground. It’s like too many eggs in the basket or too much stuff to carry. Not as enjoyable to consume much more CGI than Homecoming nor the original Spider-Man trilogy.

Each of the characters’ performances are outstanding with numerous funny dialogue, elements of surprise, and wishy-washy personalities, including those from Tony Revolori, Remy Hii, and Jon Favreau. Also, what is a big surprise is that J.K. Simmons returns to his role as J. Jonah Jameson from the original Spider-Man trilogy, co-starring with Tobey Maguire. However, what I did not like about this film is when several characters reveal and discover Spider-Man’s true identity, which is very untraditional to these Spider-Man films as this serves a biggest climax of the film’s plot and my personal biggest takeaway from this film.

Out of all the colors in the film, if you ask where does Far From Home fall on the scale of one to ten? My main answer is that the good movie with richer taste of malevolence and Peter Parker’s character as an ordinary human with valuable consequences to be summoned. Although, it wasn’t as enjoyable as the last one and Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, for which it won an Oscar for Best Animated Feature. It is a superhero film, but it’s actually placed in the romance section for that matter. I like it, but my higher expectations seem to drop down lower than I expected. That’s all I going to say, I can’t give out any spoilers away on the film, but as a final warning, do not watch this film if you haven’t seen Endgame yet. Running time: 129 minutes

Don’t forget, please stick around after the movie for the post-credits scenes.



GRADE: B

(Review by Henry Pham)






Bookmark and Share

Midsommar






(Review by Chase Lee)



Bookmark and Share

Spiderman Far From Home








(Review by Chase Lee)




Bookmark and Share

MIdsommar






Last year Ari Aster’s debut feature film “Hereditary” was released. The film – chilling, hypnotic, and oozing with dread (not to mention an incredible lead performance from Toni Collette) – instantly became a hit with both horror fans and the art-house crowd, leaving viewers ravenous for more from the director. His sophomore feature, “Midsommar,” is finally upon us.



Florence Pugh plays Dani, a young woman whose close-knit family is currently experiencing some familial problems. Dani’s boyfriend, Christian (Jack Reynor), has grown tired of dealing with her but doesn’t have the guts to break off their relationship, something his friends – Josh (William Jackson Harper), Pelle (Vilhelm Blomgren), and Mark (Will Poulter) – encourage him to do.



The film’s prologue plays out in the desolate, dead of winter as the film’s ominous soundtrack (the orchestral score by The Haxan Cloak is perhaps the best part of the movie) envelops the viewer in Dani’s sense of dread as she worries about her bipolar sister. The casting is spot on, Pugh is fantastic as usual and Reynor does a great job playing her wishy-washy, spineless boyfriend. Aster builds up the dynamic between the characters, laying a layer of insecurity for Dani and Christian’s strained relationship (something the already stressed Dani knows nothing about) that comes into play later on, as Dani experiences a devastating emotional blow, something that leaves her in a deep depression and causes the reluctant Christian to continue their relationship. Unbeknownst to Dani, Christian and his friends are going to Sweden. The trio – Christian, Josh, and Mark – has been invited by Pelle to visit his commune while they perform their Midsommar festivities, an event that occurs every ninety years. Shocked to learn of their trip right before it happens, Dani is invited to tagalong by Christian.



The wide-open, green, and sunny Swedish countryside that Dani now finds herself in is a stark juxtaposition to the claustrophobic, bleak, and snow-filled prologue. But the touring Americans don’t find themselves in a leisurely getaway. Instead, stuck in a locale where they don’t know the customs or the language, the cheery landscape starts to entrap them.



Cinematographer Pawel Pogorzelski does an excellent job of shooting the film. The prologue is dark and confined and shadow-filled before the story is shifted to Sweden. There, the photography is often overblown, the cast shot in wide shots that allow the viewer to soak in the greenery of the commune and its odd architectural structures.



Many will note the similarities of Aster’s “Midsommar” to Robin Hardy’s 1973 horror hit “The Wicker Man,” recently remade in 2006 starring Nicolas Cage. Though their specifics are different, it’s obvious that Aster was inspired by Hardy for his newest film. As a result, “Midsommar” is a movie that ultimately feels like one you’ve already seen despite Aster’s insertion of some slightly xenophobic commentary. Its character arcs and storyline are predictable with its end result all too transparent.



Like “Hereditary,” “Midsommar” goes for a slow-moving approach to its terror. The narrative, purposefully paced (to its own detriment) and overly long, crawls its way to its inevitable and predictable conclusion. At a runtime of nearly two and a half hours, Aster’s movie edges on the side of self-indulgence. The same story could have been told in a shorter timeframe, though part of this reaction could be the result of having to deal with rude viewers who couldn’t sit quietly through the movie.



“Midsommar” is a film that general audiences are going to have a hard time sitting through. It’s best to think of it like a drama with horror elements rather than an outright horror movie. It’s definitely worth seeing but perhaps best to hold off for a home viewing without distractions. Aster is creating a mood here and the mood can be easily broken by the wrong audience.
(Review by Bret Oswald)






Bookmark and Share

Spiderman Far From Home





Marvel’s final film in their third Phase, “Spider-Man: Far from Home” arrives with some big expectations. “Far from Home,” the third film released this year in Marvel’s cinematic universe, returns the series to a smaller scale despite its international locales. Where “Endgame” was vast in scope and somber, “Far from Home” goes in the opposite direction, presenting a zippy, fast-paced blockbuster.



In Mexico, Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) and Agent Maria Hill (Cobie Smulders) investigate a suspicious “natural disaster” where they meet a new hero Quentin Beck (Jake Gyllenhaal), later to be known as Mysterio. The scene, so short it feels like you could blink and miss it, does little more than offer a hint of what’s to come and give viewers a brief introduction to a new character before shifting the focus to the titular hero.



Tom Holland returns as Peter Parker, aka Spider-Man, as the world continues to attempt to recover from the mess created by Thanos. Peter wants nothing more than to kick-back, relax, and enjoy his European school trip with his classmates – including his best friend Ned (Jacob Batalon), romantic interest MJ (Zendaya), and class bully Flash (Tony Revolori) – but as usual for a superhero, duty calls. Instead of getting to focus on getting together with MJ, who’s also getting advances from classmate Brad (Remy Hii), Peter finds himself partnered up with Mysterio to save the world from a new threat.



Jon Watts, director of the web-slingers last solo movie, “Spider-Man: Homecoming,” is once again in the director’s chair. Working off a script by Chris McKenna and Erik Sommers, Watts presents a film that’s light-hearted and funny without ignoring or belittling the emotional baggage, which is obviously taking its toll on Peter, the characters carry over from previous events. The film’s many action scenes are well handled. Watts shoots them in a manner that makes them easy to follow without being dull.



The cast delivers fine performances. Holland does an excellent job showing Peter as he attempts to deal with the issues he’s confronted with, both those that teens are typically exposed to and those they are not. The relationships between the cast members also works well. The rapport between Peter and Ned is sharp, his awkward interactions with MJ (this new darker take on the character is still hard to swallow but Zendaya plays the part well) feel natural, and he’s able to hold his own against his professional acquaintances, like Beck and Fury. Gyllenhaal continues to show off his acting range with his first role in a superhero movie. The writers use the characters’ romantic relationships for comedic fodder. Ned unexpectedly falls for one of their classmates and Aunt May and Happy Hogan, Marisa Tomei and Jon Favreau respectively, are engaged in a suggested romantic fling. Both couples’ interactions are used in humorous ways to lighten the mood.



“Far from Home,” is a tighter paced movie than “Endgame,” which felt like it could have used some trimming in more than a few places. While “Far from Home” also has a few of these moments, they are less noticeable with the narrative moving the story along almost as soon as a stagnation in pacing is felt. The film would have left a much better impression had it not been for one of the credit scenes, which may rub more than a few viewers the wrong way. Still, “Far from Home” is a lot of fun.
(Review by Bret Oswald)




Bookmark and Share

Sunday, June 30, 2019

Movies Scheduled for the Week of Jun 30 - Jul 6



We made it through June! On to July and the heat!

According to Mind on Movies they won't be doing a promo screening for Lion King. That's disappointing but no long crowded lines. We will have to shell out some $$ to see it.

Y'all are still responding to the list when someone offers passes. You MUST reply to the person offering the pass and not to the whole group.

It's a holiday weekend so only one screening this week.

Jun 30 - Jul 6

Tue - Jul 2

Stuber - 7:00 pm = Angelika





Bookmark and Share

Thursday, June 27, 2019

Yesterday






(Review by Chase Lee)




Bookmark and Share

Yesterday





Who doesn't love the Beatles? The English pop group exploded on the scene in the early 60's and took over the music world with their huge catalog of unforgettable music as a group and their solo projects. But what if the world didn't know they even existed and their tunes where lost to the the void. That's the premise of the film directed by Danny Boyle (Slumdog Millionaire) and written with Richard Curtis (Notting Hill, Love Actually). Curtis infuses the story with his unique talent for quirky romances. While this movie is sort of about the music, it's really the unrequited romance brewing.

Himesh Patel is brilliant as Jack Malik, a struggling singer/songwriter who has yet to find any type of success outside of his handful of faithful friends. He's managed by long time best friend Ellie (Lily Collins), a school teacher, who finds him gigs in all sorts of places with unfortunately very small and uninterested audiences. Jack has basically decided to give it all up when he's hit by a bus during a world wide black out that lasts 12 seconds. Ellie gives him a new guitar since he lost it in the accident so he plays his friends Paul McCarthy's Yesterday as a thank you. His friends are gobsmacked and wonder when he wrote it. Insisting it was Paul...of George, Paul, John and Ringo...the Beatles, they have no idea what he is talking about. Googling the Beatles brings a search for bugs. Looking through his record albums, all his Beatle albums are gone. He begins to try and remember every Beatle songs, littering his wall with post it's while trying to recall the lyrics. It all begins to cascade from there. He finds a local studio where he cuts a CD of Beatles hits and hands them out to customers where he works at wholesale warehouse. The local TV show feature's him as the singing warehouse worker. Ed Sheeran sees the show and comes by his house and asks him to open his tour of Europe.

The fame and success that he's worked for most of his life is finally happening, but Jack feels guilty because he didn't actually write these songs. He falls in with Ed's smarmy music industry agent Debra Hammer (Kate McKinnon who is wonderfully wicked) who brings him to California to record and remake his image into a proper product. Jack finds himself in a complicated mess of the music world overkill, fans chasing him everywhere and longing for the simple life with his pals and his best friend Ellie. It's a sweet and sometimes predictable story of you don't know what you got til it's gone. Then there's these mysterious people waving a Yellow Submarine at him feeding his paranoia. The best part is the Beatles are re-introduced to this new generation with fresh arrangements. His rendition of Help! is full of urgent angst that almost outshines the original. It's easily the feel good movie of the year an Ed Sheeran is in it.
(Review by reesa)




Bookmark and Share

ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE DFW EXTENDS TEACHER APPRECIATION WEDNESDAYS THROUGH AUGUST!





ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE DFW EXTENDS
TEACHER APPRECIATION WEDNESDAYS
THROUGH AUGUST!


Teacher-themed Special Menu available to teachers (and everyone!)
all day long on Wednesdays through August 28!

Dallas, TX - June 27, 2019 - Alamo Drafthouse DFW is excited to announce that Teacher Appreciation Wednesdays are extending through the rest of the summer at all Alamo Drafthouse DFW locations!

Teachers, faculty and school staff can enjoy a FREE ticket every Wednesday before 5:00pm until August 28, 2019. Bring your valid faculty or school employee ID to the box office and choose from any regular show before 5:00pm on any Wednesday in July and August. Homeschooling parents, you're included too. Just bring along documentation that shows that you are also a teacher.

Additionally, Alamo Drafthouse DFW has created a teacher-themed special menu that will only be available on Teacher Appreciation Wednesdays in July and August. Featuring Chalk Dusted Popcorn (popcorn dusted with white cheddar seasoning), the Professor Pie Shake (an apple pie shake topped with caramel sauce, whip cream and graham cracker crumbles), Principal Pretzel & Coach Beer Cheese (salted pretzel bites with a side of beer cheese), and other delights, the special menu will be available to ALL guests throughout the entire day each Wednesday through August 28.


The Teacher Appreciation Wednesday offer is only valid in person at the box office at the six DFW-area locations: Alamo Drafthouse Cedars, Denton, Lake Highlands, Las Colinas, North Richland Hills, and Richardson. Offer excludes special events (Movie Parties, Video Dance Parties, Feasts, etc.).

Alamo Drafthouse DFW social media:
Facebook: facebook.com/AlamoDrafthouseDFW
Twitter: twitter.com/AlamoDFW
Instagram: instagram.com/alamodfw
Website: drafthouse.com/dfw



About Alamo Drafthouse
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema was founded in 1997 as a single-screen mom and pop repertory theater in Austin, TX. Twenty-two years later, with 38 locations and counting, Alamo Drafthouse has been called "the best theater in America" by Entertainment Weekly and "the best theater in the world" by Wired. Alamo Drafthouse has built a reputation as a movie lover's oasis not only by combining food and drink service with the movie-going experience, but also introducing unique programming and high-profile, star-studded special events. Alamo Drafthouse created Fantastic Fest, a world renowned film festival dubbed "The Geek Telluride" by Variety. Fantastic Fest showcases eight days of genre cinema from independents, international filmmakers and major Hollywood studios. Alamo Drafthouse's collectible art gallery, Mondo, offers breathtaking, original products featuring designs from world-famous artists based on licenses for popular TV and Movie properties including Star Wars, Star Trek & Universal Monsters. Alamo Drafthouse continues to expand its brand in new and exciting ways, including Birth.Movies.Death., an entertainment content platform for movie lovers, and the American Genre Film Archive, a nonprofit film archive dedicated to preserving, restoring and sharing film.


Bookmark and Share

ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE PRESENTS A “KING-SIZE SUMMER” CELEBRATING MASTER OF HORROR STEPHEN KING




ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE PRESENTS A
“KING-SIZE SUMMER”
CELEBRATING MASTER OF HORROR
STEPHEN KING

Austin, TX – June 27, 2019 – Alamo Drafthouse Cinema is celebrating the master of horror Stephen King with a curated selection of cult and classic adaptations, beginning in July through the highly anticipated release of IT: CHAPTER TWO. Kicking off with a month of Terror Tuesday programming in Austin and culminating in nationwide screenings of four films in all Alamo Drafthouse cities, audiences will be able to experience a “King-Size Summer” of terror on the big screen once again.

The lineup includes an Alamo Drafthouse-wide re-release of CREEPSHOW, MAXIMUM OVERDRIVE, THE RUNNING MAN, and STAND BY ME starting in August, along with select screenings of additional classics like CARRIE, PET SEMATARY, THE MIST, and more!

“We’re crazy with anticipation for IT: CHAPTER TWO, so to ease the wait, we’re revisiting some of our favorite Stephen King adaptations,” said Sarah Pitre, senior director of programming and promotions. “These screenings will provide a chilling countdown to the final chapter of one of his most beloved works of fiction. Plus, it’s a great opportunity to build up our fear tolerance before we’re scared out of our minds by IT: CHAPTER TWO!!”

From terrifying classics (CARRIE) to anthologies (CREEPSHOW), coming of age dramas (STAND BY ME) and sci-fi dystopias (THE RUNNING MAN) Stephen King adaptations have captivated audiences for decades.

“Stephen King loves genre movies as much as we do,” said Joe Ziemba, director of genre programming. “From gushing about horror in the non-fiction book DANSE MACABRE to directing MAXIMUM OVERDRIVE, King’s passion for film is infectious. That feeling is represented in every movie that we’ve chosen in this celebration of his cinematic legacy.”

CREEPSHOW
(Alamo Drafthouse-wide)
The seminal 1980s horror anthology to end all seminal 1980s horror anthologies, CREEPSHOW is pop-art splatterfest that’s oozing with senior citizen zombies, bad dads, furry beasties, disco dance-offs, cockroach war-zones, and Stephen King turning into a plant.

MAXIMUM OVERDRIVE (Alamo Drafthouse-wide)
MAXIMUM OVERDRIVE is the ultimate Stephen King retreat into total excess, a savage glimpse into the horror maestro’s deepest id and weirdest whims. King directs King! A plastic Green Goblin steals the show! Prepare to be THUNDERSTRUCK! Wheeling between high-octane action, gruesome bloodletting, and goofball humor, this is an explosive oil pyre of F-U-N.

THE RUNNING MAN (Alamo Drafthouse-wide)
Based on a novella by Stephen King (as Richard Bachman), this violent and legitimately funny sci-fi action romp is an underrated classic of the ‘80s.

STAND BY ME (Alamo Drafthouse-wide)
Based on Stephen King’s novella, Rob Reiner’s film about the sadness that comes with the end of childhood innocence still maintains an emotional resonance decades later. Entertaining, moving, beautifully shot and naturally acted STAND BY ME is one of the most unpretentious looks at that too-often used buzz term of "coming of age."

CARRIE (Brooklyn, Yonkers)
Thanks to Stephen King and Brian DePalma, prom was transformed from a symbol of happiness to a violent hellscape of death. With DePalma’s bag of stylized tricks and King’s knack for pulpy shocks, CARRIE is a special kind of horror masterpiece that only comes along once every two-thousand years.

CHRISTINE (Austin, Brooklyn)
CHRISTINE is John Carpenter's go-for-broke assault on coming-of-age sentimentality in the form of a killer car movie. Adapted from Stephen King's novel and feeling like it’s set one town over from Haddonfield in HALLOWEEN, this brooding hellraiser plays out like a greatest hits compilation from Carpenter and King's respective careers.

THE DARK HALF (Austin)
Based on King’s meta-fueled novel and directed by horror legend Romero (DAWN OF THE DEAD), THE DARK HALF is a smart and overlooked creeper from the pre-SCREAM era.

THE DEAD ZONE (Austin)
A super-powers team-up between director David Cronenberg (THE FLY) and Stephen King seems like an impossible dream. But it happened. And it’s GREAT.

FIRESTARTER
(Austin)
No matter what script you start with, any film with the star of PATTON, the star of APOCALYPSE NOW, and the star of E.T. – all directed by the guy who did CLASS OF 1984 – is gonna turn out pretty wonderful. What a bonus, then, to have it be a whackadoo Stephen King adaptation.

THE GREEN MILE (Austin)
Based upon the Stephen King serial novel, the Academy Award nominated THE GREEN MILE is a dense and enthralling film that'll lead to introspection and the thought of what it means to lead a truly fulfilling life.

THE MIST (Austin)
A wonderful blend of slimy creature-feature horror, paranoia, and commentary on the inherent terror of just being inside a grocery store. It’s also a total gem, and one of the meanest Stephen King adaptations ever put to film. Featuring scenery-chomping performances by the likes of Tom Jane and Marcia Gay Harden – as well as acid-spiders, a giant squid, and spindle-legged beasties that would have made Salvador Dali scream with delight – THE MIST never shies away being a nasty little piece of nightmare-fuel.

PET SEMATARY
(Austin, Brooklyn)
The original adaptation of Stephen King's meditation on grief, scripted by King himself and directed by Mary Lambert, is heartbreaking, horrific, and a touch campy. Complete with a theme song from the Ramones, PET SEMATARY sums up how we all really feel about death – it's "no fair."

SLEEPWALKERS (Austin, San Francisco)
Filled with gory carnage, jaw-dropping special effects, and a constant barrage of insanity, SLEEPWALKERS is the ultimate WTF party in Stephen King’s filmography. It’s a blast.


Alamo Drafthouse DFW social media:
Facebook: facebook.com/AlamoDrafthouseDFW
Twitter: twitter.com/AlamoDFW
Instagram: instagram.com/alamodfw
Website: drafthouse.com/dfw



About Alamo Drafthouse
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema was founded in 1997 as a single-screen mom and pop repertory theater in Austin, TX. Twenty-two years later, with 38 locations and counting, Alamo Drafthouse has been called "the best theater in America" by Entertainment Weekly and "the best theater in the world" by Wired. Alamo Drafthouse has built a reputation as a movie lover's oasis not only by combining food and drink service with the movie-going experience, but also introducing unique programming and high-profile, star-studded special events. Alamo Drafthouse created Fantastic Fest, a world renowned film festival dubbed "The Geek Telluride" by Variety. Fantastic Fest showcases eight days of genre cinema from independents, international filmmakers and major Hollywood studios. Alamo Drafthouse's collectible art gallery, Mondo, offers breathtaking, original products featuring designs from world-famous artists based on licenses for popular TV and Movie properties including Star Wars, Star Trek & Universal Monsters. Alamo Drafthouse continues to expand its brand in new and exciting ways, including Birth.Movies.Death., an entertainment content platform for movie lovers, and the American Genre Film Archive, a non-profit film archive dedicated to preserving, restoring and sharing film.





Bookmark and Share

Sunday, June 23, 2019

Movies Scheduled for the Week of Jun 23 - Jun 29



Wow...its almost July. This past month has moved quickly. Lots of humidity and rain. I guess we can look forward to triple digits for next month. Yuk.

We still have Lion King to look forward to soon. Remember if you see something please share with group. PLEASE make sure you write directly to the person offering passes. If it comes to the group mail it will be rejected.



June 23 - June 27

Mon - Jun 24

Yesterday - 7:00 pm - Cinemark Northeast Mall Hurst
Annebelle Comes Home - 7:30 pm - Cinemark 17

Tue - Jun 25

Yesterday - 7:00 pm - Angelika

Wed - Jun 26

Spiderman Comes Home - 7:30 pm - Alamo Drafthouse Lake HIghlands and AMC Northpark






Bookmark and Share

Tuesday, June 18, 2019

Oak Cliff Film Festival - Daniel Isn't Real






A man enters a diner and starts shooting at everyone inside. A small boy, Luke (Griffin Robert Faulkner), flees his parent’s New York City apartment to get away from their constant bickering. The two unconnected events become a turning point in Luke’s life when he happens upon the crime scene, now taped off and in the process of being investigated by police, the shooter’s bullet-ridden body hanging out the diner’s open door. As he observes this disturbing tableau, Luke meets a new friend, Daniel (Nathan Chandler Reid). His friendship with his new friend, who only Luke can see, leads to trouble resulting in his mother (Mary Stuart Masterson) forcing him to lock his troublesome imaginary friend up in her mother’s old dollhouse.

Years later, Luke (Miles Robbins) moves out of his mother’s home and across the city into a college dorm. Her mental health, stable while she was caring for her son, takes a sharp decline following his move causing Luke to worry that he may someday inherit her schizophrenia symptoms. Luke’s psychologist (Chukwudi Iwuji) suggests facing his childhood demons head-on and encourages him to release his imaginary friend from his holding cell, the dollhouse. Daniel (Patrick Schwarzenegger) is fully grown now too and his demented streak has only gotten worse.

Directed by Adam Egypt Mortimer and based on a novel, “In This Way I Was Saved,” by Brian DeLeeuw, who co-wrote the screenplay with Mortimer, “Daniel Isn’t Real” is a horror film that plays with the audience’s expectations. Daniel attempts to enforce his personality on Luke. At first, helping him out by introducing him to a pair of potential romantic interests – Cassie (Sasha Lane) and Sophie (Hannah Marks) – before delving once again into his darker personality traits. Is Daniel a symptom of an emerging mental illness or is he something else?

Robbins and Schwarzenegger play off each other nicely. Schwarzenegger plays a Tyler Durden-esque character (complete with the character’s stylishly loud outfits) to Robbins meeker Narrator-like one. Not that “Fight Club” is a film that is completely comparable to this one but the dynamic between Daniel and Luke has a similar feel to the one between Tyler Durden and the Narrator. Schwarzenegger’s Daniel domineers over the screen as Robbins’s Luke attempts to remove his imaginary friend from his life once and for all.

By this movie’s finale, things may not go in the direction you expect. Mortimer puts the film together well – finely acted, well shot, and compellingly told. “Daniel Isn’t Real” isn’t a perfect movie but the right audience will have a lot of fun with it. Hopefully, they won’t end up surrounded by people whose cell phones continually go off during the film like I did, making me wonder if I’d have a slightly higher opinion of this without the many distractions.
(Review by Bret Oswald)





Bookmark and Share