The Dallas Movie Screening Group

This is the homepage of the Dallas Movie Screening Group. To join our mailing list you must sign up at our group page on Yahoo. You will then be connected to receive notices on how to find passes to the local screenings in the DFW area. It's up to you to pickup or sign up for passes. You can also barter, trade or just giveaway passes you don't want, need or share with other members of the group. Please read the instructions on the Yahoo page very carefully before posting. This group is closely moderated so that your mail box is not full of spam or other unnecessary mail. We appreciate everyone's consideration and cooperation.

You can use this homepage for posting comments, reviews, and other things that cannot be posted to the group. Of course spam is not allowed. Thanks!

To join the Dallas Movie Screening Yahoo Group:
dallasmoviescreenings-subscribe@yahoogroups.com

Reesa's Reviews can also be found at:
http://www.moviegeekfeed.com

Logo art by Steve Cruz http://www.mfagallery.com

Website and Group Contact: dalscreenings@gmail.com

Tuesday, July 30, 2019

AFFD2019 - Wish You Were Here





Fashion designer Yuan Yuan (Feihong Yu) is approached by a design student from Japan, Keiko (Ayana Kinoshita). Surprisingly, Keiko is taken in by the high-profile Yuan Yuan with open arms instead of being turned away as expected. Yuan Yuan shows Keiko around her studio, inviting the young woman into her inner circle and the design process as she plans her new show.



Kenneth Bi’s new feature, “Wish You Were Here,” could pass for a quite different film from that opening description but, as viewers are inserted into the world of Yuan Yuan it becomes apparent that something isn’t quite right. The film’s morose tone is apparent from its snow-filled, cold-colored opening shot with cinematographer Roman Jakobi’s imagery aided by Andre Matthias’s score. Throughout the film, Matthias uses a mixture of intricately orchestrated strings and chords from a mournful piano to help build up the darker elements hiding beneath this film’s surface.



Keiko’s sudden appearance reminds Yuan Yuan of her youth and causes her to begin to confront her past. A series of flashbacks is threaded into the narrative, revealing Yuan Yuan’s unhappy life as a young wife. As Keiko and Yuan Yuan grow closer, Bi’s film becomes more somber. The flashbacks lead to revelations which result in Yuan Yuan deciding the time is right to try to reconcile with her ex-husband, Tomiya (Takao Ohsawa).



Jakobi austerely photographs “Wish You Were Here,” using the icy-weathered backdrop to mirror the character’s forlorn feelings. Scenes are well blocked with the characters starkly and aesthetically placed within the frame. The past and present are seamlessly fused together making the story easy to follow, or so I thought. There is a revelation thrown in toward the end that seemed to throw many in the audience for a loop, causing some to be left confused by the film’s conclusion.



Performances from the cast are fine. The stylish Yuan Yuan is excellently portrayed by Yu. She captures the woman’s subtle feelings of regret as she is forced to face decisions from her past. Yuriko Hoshi plays Yuan Yuan’s Japanese mother-in-law, clearly showing the characters sternly adamant rejection of her Chinese daughter-in-law. Her rejection being a major deciding factor in ending her marriage.



“Wish You Were Here” shows how previous decisions can continue to affect a person later in life. It’s a depressing story, sure to be a turn-off for some viewers, but it’s well told, acted, and photographed.
(Review by Bret Oswald)






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This Week at the Alamo Drafthouse





Calling all movie lovers… Here’s what’s happening this week at Alamo Drafthouse DFW!

To celebrate the release of Quentin Tarantino’s ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD, which follows an actor and his stunt double, Alamo Drafthouse kicks off DON’T TRY THIS AT HOME - a month-long programming series running throughout the month of August featuring daring, explosive, stunt-tastic films that will make your heart race and your palms sweat. But remember, kids… Don’t try this at home! For a full calendar listing, please visit drafthouse.com/dfw/calendar.

See y’all soon at the Alamo Drafthouse!



This Week's Highlights…

August Series: Don’t Try This At Home
- Alamo Drafthouse’s August programming series "Don’t Try This At Home” is a stunt-tastic, stunt-splosive, and stunt-sational film series inspired by ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD, and it all kicks off this week with the HOT ROD Movie Party at Lake Highlands, a free screening of STEAMBOAT BILL, JR. for Victory members (Join Alamo’s free Victory rewards program today!) at Richardson, and HOOPER at North Richland Hills, Richardson, Denton, and Las Colinas.


MONDAY | JULY 29
Cedars
Screening: Kids Camp: Teen Titans Go! To The Movies at 10:00AM

Denton
Screening: Kids Camp: The Great Muppet Caper at 10:00AM

Lake Highlands
Screening: Kids Camp: The Lego Movie at 10:00AM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Vetted Well at 8:00PM

Las Colinas
Screening: Kids Camp: Casper at 10:00AM

North Richland Hills
Screening: Kids Camp: The Lego Movie at 10:00AM

Richardson
Screening: Kids Camp: The Great Muppet Caper at 10:00AM



TUESDAY | JULY 30

Cedars
Screening: Kids Camp: Teen Titans Go! To The Movies at 10:00AM

Denton
Screening: Kids Camp: The Great Muppet Caper at 10:05AM

Lake Highlands
Screening: Kids Camp: The Lego Movie at 10:00AM

Las Colinas
Screening: Kids Camp: Casper at 10:00AM

North Richland Hills
Screening: Kids Camp: The Lego Movie at 10:00AM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Vetted Well at 8:00PM

Richardson
Screening: Kids Camp: The Great Muppet Caper at 10:00AM
Bar Event: Tiki Bingo - Glass Half Full at 7:00PM



WEDNESDAY | JULY 31
All Locations: Teacher Appreciation Wednesdays: a FREE movie ticket for teachers and school faculty/staff at screenings that start before 5:00pm. Teacher-themed special menu available ALL DAY for everyone!

Cedars
Screening: Kids Camp: Teen Titans Go! To The Movies at 10:00AM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Vetted Well at 8:00PM

Denton
Screening: Kids Camp: The Great Muppet Caper at 10:05AM

Lake Highlands
Screening: Kids Camp: The Lego Movie at 10:00AM

Las Colinas
Screening: Kids Camp: Casper at 10:00AM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Vetted Well at 8:00PM

North Richland Hills
Screening: Kids Camp: The Lego Movie at 10:00AM

Richardson
Screening: Kids Camp: The Great Muppet Caper at 10:00AM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Glass Half Full at 8:00PM



THURSDAY | AUGUST 1

Cedars
Screening: Kids Camp: Teen Titans Go! To The Movies at 10:10AM

Denton
Screening: Kids Camp: The Great Muppet Caper at 10:00AM

Lake Highlands
Screening: Kids Camp: The Lego Movie at 10:00AM
Screening: Don’t Try This At Home: Hot Rod Movie Party at 7:30PM

Las Colinas
Screening: Kids Camp: Casper at 10:00AM

North Richland Hills
Screening: Kids Camp: The Lego Movie at 10:00AM

Richardson
Screening: Kids Camp: The Great Muppet Caper at 9:50AM



FRIDAY | AUGUST 2
Cedars
Screening: Kids Camp: Teen Titans Go! To The Movies at 10:00AM

Denton
Screening: Kids Camp: The Great Muppet Caper at 10:00AM

Lake Highlands
Screening: Kids Camp: The Lego Movie at 10:05AM

Las Colinas
Screening: Kids Camp: Casper at 10:00AM

North Richland Hills
Screening: Kids Camp: The Lego Movie at 10:00AM

Richardson
Screening: Kids Camp: The Great Muppet Caper at 9:50AM



SATURDAY | AUGUST 3

Lake Highlands
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink Brunch - Vetted Well at 2:00PM

North Richland Hills
Screening: Don’t Try This At Home: Hooper at 3:55PM

Richardson
Screening: Don’t Try This At Home: Hooper at 6:30PM



SUNDAY | AUGUST 4

Denton
Screening: Don’t Try This At Home: Hooper at 12:45PM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Vetted Well at 7:00PM

Las Colinas
Screening: Don’t Try This At Home: Hooper at 12:45PM

Richardson
Screening: Don’t Try This At Home: Steamboat Bill, Jr. (Free Screening) at 9:15PM



First Run Movies Now Playing...

Crawl
Midsommar
Once Upon A Time In Hollywood
Once Upon A Time In Hollywood (in 35mm)
Spider-Man: Far From Home
The Art Of Self Defense
The Lion King
Toy Story 4
Yesterday

Premiering This Week...
Hobbs & Shaw

Stay Connected...
Facebook: facebook.com/AlamoDrafthouseDFW
Twitter: twitter.com/AlamoDFW
Instagram: instagram.com/alamodfw
Website: drafthouse.com/dfw
Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | www.drafthouse.com





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Sunday, July 28, 2019

Movies Scheduled for the Week of Jul 28 - Aug 3


Why is everyone begging for passes on Facebook. There has been more than a few opportunities to enter contests or redeem passes posted to the group and Facebook. You must make an attempt to enter the contests or redeem passes on your own before you go begging. If you don't win within a day or so before event, then you can ask if anyone has a spare. And those of you who just grab passes just because they are there, please try and leave some for others if you have no plan to use them in the first place.

If you sign people up to our Facebook page, please make sure the people want to be there. AND they live in the DFW area. If your Facebook profile says you live outside of North Texas, they will not be approved.

If you are having problems with the various websites offering passes, please write to them. The group moderators only post pass availability. We don't know why your computer is giving you problems, or your phone is not cooperating with the codes the website posted. Also, we don't have passes to hand out. Thanks for your cooperation.

July 28 - August 3

Tue - Jul 30

Official Secrets - 7:00 pm - Angelika
Hobbs & Shaw - 7:30 pm - AMC Nprthpark

Wed - Jul 31

Hobbs & Shaw - 7:30 pm - AMC Nprthpark

Thu - Aug 1

The Art of Racing in the Rain - 7:00 pm - Angelika



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18th Annual Asian Film Festival of Dallas Award Winners





FESTIVAL AWARDS OF THE 18th ANNUAL ASIAN FILM FESTIVAL OF DALLAS
PRESENTED BY WELL GO USA ENTERTAINMENT

Congratulations to all the filmmakers, from 20 countries worldwide, who participated in the 18th Annual Asian Film Festival of Dallas presented by Well Go USA Entertainment! AFFD is proud to announce our 2019 festival award winners.


Feature Film Winners

Best Narrative Feature

LONG TIME NO SEA

Best Documentary Feature

GEOGRAPHIES OF KINSHIP


Short Film Winners

Best Overall Short

THE VISIT

Best Short

THE WINNER

Best Drama Short

ALIEN

Best Women’s Short

THE VISIT

Best Experimental Short
LAST CHOICE: A STORY ABOUT HIKIKOMORI

Best Documentary Short
FIRST STREET NORTH

Best Late Night Short

SPORTS DAY

Special Jury Mention
THE MOTHER

Student Short Winners

Best High School Short

BAIT

Best College Short
TAKE ME HOME








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AFFD2019 - Call Heaven to Heaven




Movies in the thriller genre seem to fall into one of two categories - those that work and those that don’t. Director Oxide Pang’s new film, “Call Heaven to Heaven,” is one that falls into the latter category.



Pang’s movie is a hectically edited mess of a film. Viewers are immediately introduced to the movie's quick and choppy editing style as its lead characters - two social media stars, Mengli and Xiaomiao (played by Joyin Choi and YoMi respectively), and their friend Yuying (Kabby Hui) - decide to do a live feed of an outdoors adventure. The film’s editing decisions were likely chosen by Pang to mirror the fast-paced world of Mengli and Xiaomiao’s social media presence.



The trio decides to go camping on an island, bringing along the boyfriends of two of the girls. The importance of these two to the plot is so low that I couldn’t even begin to guess which boy belonged with which girl. At the waterfront, the group discovers that the ferry has already left for the day and decide to accept a ride in the boat of an older woman, Granny Xiong (Cao Yang).



This is only the insipid stars' first mistake (with many more yet to come). Midway into the ride, Granny proposes the group head to a more remote, less-traveled though still touristy island that she claims has wi-fi access to film their show from. The five-some agrees, only to learn after they are dropped off that the promised tourists and shops are nowhere to be seen. Abandoned without internet or cellphone access, the group is soon in over their heads because Granny lives alone on the island with her deformed grandson and she wants him to mate with the girls.



Their boyfriends are quickly dispatched, and the girls easily kidnapped and locked away; their only hope to appease the crazed Granny. Pang’s film is sure to irritate its share of viewers either through its abuse of the lead characters, their idiotic behavior / choices, or both… as if the Michael-Bay-style-editing alone wasn’t bad enough.



Once locked up, the trio begins to plan their escape. But each eventual attempted escape is, of course, quickly thwarted because otherwise there wouldn’t be enough to fill a feature film. The girls stupidly never take the opportunities they are handed to incapacitate their captors, making sitting through this movie even more annoying (there are multiple opportune moments that they could have used to their advantage).



Amongst the insipid story and nauseously edited ruckus, some elements manage to shine through. There are a couple of well-handled and well-composed shots, mostly toward the film’s concluding moments when the camera glides along behind the girl’s as they attempt to escape. This skillfully handled shot abandons the hectic nature of the rest of the movie for some unknown reason.



Even with these few well-handled moments, this movie is terrible. It’s a noxious, horribly handled exploitative story, that perhaps could have worked at least slightly better with a different approach. “Call Heaven to Heaven” has been met with censorship problems in its home country, China, so who knows when or if it will see a more prominent release - not that anyone will (or should) care. Nothing in this film lands. Despite the contents of its story, it’s neither thrilling or scary, just something viewers will wish to quickly end out of boredom and lack of caring.
(Review by Bret Oswald)





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AFFD2019 - Asako 1 & 2





Based on a novel by Tomoka Shibasaki, the title of director Ryūsuke Hamaguchi‘s film, “Asako I & II,” gives the impression of a work that conjoins two different productions, perhaps two shorter films edited into one feature, rather than the title of a single feature film. Hamaguchi’s film follows Asako (Erika Karata), the lead character’s name used for the film’s title instead of the title of the novel, “Netemo Sametemo,” over the course of nearly a decade.



When the movie starts, Asako is wandering through a photography exhibit at an art museum. There, she meets free spirit Baku (Masahiro Higashide). Despite the concerns of her friends, Asako begins to date Baku. Their fling is short-lived. Baku has a tendency to wander away for extended periods of time without telling anyone where he’s going. One day he leaves and never returns.



Two years later, Asako is now working in Tokyo where she meets Ryohei (also played by Higashide). Taken aback by his physical similarities to her lost love, Asako timidly enters into a friendship with Ryohei, reluctant to commit due to her still strong emotional attachment to the absent Baku. Ryohei, the polar opposite of Baku, grounded and loyal, falls for Asako, forcing her to choose whether or not she wants to continue pining away for a long-lost boyfriend or focus on what’s actually in front of her.



It becomes apparent that the film’s title is introducing the idea of the double. In the case of Baku/Ryohei, the doppelganger. The idea is physically shown by Higashide’s dual performance. In the case of Asako, the duality of her desires. The idea is metaphorically shown in Asako’s naive, youthful desire for Baku and her experienced, grown-up decision to date Ryohei. The lines between her dual desires are blurred when, five years after meeting Ryohei, Baku makes a sudden reappearance in her life.



Hamaguchi’s film is finely put together, featuring an excellent performance by Higashide. He does a great job of portraying Asako’s two boyfriends. Viewers who don’t know that Higashide is playing both characters - one aloof and mysterious, the other attentive and straight-forward - may find themselves wondering if they are played by two different actors. Karata, a TV actress making her feature debut, is fine as Asako. She shows the young woman’s crush-like attachment to Baku before showing her more jaded and hesitant affection for Ryohei. The duo works off of each other well, making their multiple on-screen relationships believable.



The material is handled well by Hamaguchi, who keeps the film from delving too much into angsty melodrama during the characters' teen years or veering into soap opera-esque territory once the characters are working adults. “Asako I & II” goes on a tad too long as Asako comes to her final decision on the direction she wants her life to go. Some of her actions make it hard to believe the eventual resolution. Hamaguchi doesn’t tie things up in a clean knot, making things slightly more believable.
(Review by Bret Oswald)






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AFFD2019 - The Widowed Witch






Writer / director Chengjie Cai’s debut feature “The Widowed Witch” troubles viewers with its incoherent narrative. Cai tells of three-time widow, Er Hao (Tian Tian), a woman now thought to be cursed by her fellow townspeople.



“The Widowed Witch” opens with a scene shot in color – a wooded landscape, snow covered and barren treed, that Er Hao and a man are walking through. They come upon another man, who kills her companion and blows a fiery torch into her face. When she awakens, she’s paralyzed. Her world now shot in grim black-and-white. Unable to move but fully conscious, she’s incapable of answering her care-givers or fending off unwanted advances when no one else is around.



It’s during this unwanted sexual encounter that Cai inserts the film’s title sequence. When Er Hao is in her paralyzed state, the film is shown from her perspective. The camera is placed where her head rests and there it stays, showing the voyeuristic audience members only what this vulnerable woman can see. It’s not clear from the way these opening scenes are handled that the woman in the color sequence, the woman who’s face we don’t see, and the woman who we eventually come to see as the main character are one-in-the-same, making it seem as if the opening scenes of “The Widowed Witch” are completely unrelated to the rest of the film. This stylistic choice causes the remainder of the movie to be less engaging, causing viewers who don’t catch on to wonder when the opening scenes are going to come back into play.



Er Hao finds herself without a home, hers having been destroyed in the same explosion that killed her most recent husband. The opening scene in the woods is a dream used to convey this information instead of seeing their home explode. Stuck with the care of a young child (whose connection to her is never made clear as far as I could tell), she lives a nomadic life in a van. That is until she’s mistaken for a true shaman and begins using her “gifts” to get herself and her ward room and board.



Cai keeps the footage in dim black-and-white, occasionally accenting objects with illuminating colors – some lights and the coals of a burning fire. The film is told through a series of long-takes similar to the opening shots of Er Hao’s paralyzed-point-of-view. This editing technique gives the film a glacially slow, excruciating pace. It feels as though nothing is happening for long stretches of time, exacerbated by the knowledge of the film’s incongruous opening scene.



By the time “The Widowed Witch” sluggishly ends, it’s more than over-stayed its welcome. It’s a film that more of an endurance test than it is something pleasurable to watch. To be honest, I absolutely hated watching this film. At times, it was photographically pleasing, but overall, pure torture to watch from beginning to end.
(Review by Bret Oswald)




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Saturday, July 27, 2019

AFFD2019 - The Third Wife




Fourteen-year-old May (Nguyen Phuong Tra My) enters into her marriage to Hung (Le Vu Long) in the opening moments of “The Third Wife.” She’s, as the title describes, the wealthy landowners third wife, brought into the household in addition to his other two wives – Xuan (Mai Thu Huong Maya) and Ha (Tran Nu Yên-Khê). The film follows May as she learns her new role in Hung’s house – basically to supply the man with a much wanted son, his other two wives having only supplied him with one, Xuan’s son (Nguyen Thanh Tam).



Writer / director Ash Mayfair introduces the audience to the world of nineteenth century Vietnam through the eyes of May. May soon becomes pregnant, her innocence and subsequent pregnancy illuminated by metaphor – the life cycle of moths. A close up of their worm-like state is shown before showing them in their cocoons after May first has intercourse, a visual signal of her upcoming pregnancy.



For most of its runtime, “The Third Wife” is an excellent movie that’s beautifully photographed as it chronicles May’s induction into the household and her pregnancy. Though the film’s characters live in a luxurious home, they don’t all live luxurious lives. The harshness of life during that time period is revealed as May navigates her way into her new life. Still more child than woman, May leans on Hung’s other wives to show her the way, resulting in a greater attachment to them than to her own husband.



“The Third Wife” is a slower paced movie. In this case, the pace works in the film’s favor. Audiences are given the chance to observe the household, viewing the customs and habits of the people of this distant time. A wealthy background wasn’t sure to induce happiness. Daughters were considered undesirable because they were women, their enforced societal roles equally undesirable, while sons were faced with unwanted arranged marriages in substitution for love.



Any good momentum built throughout the film is lost in its concluding moments. The final twenty minutes (estimated) cause the end of the story to feel clunkily closed off, extending the narrative past its expected conclusion. Viewers are presented with footage chronicling the fate of a minor character, the footage lasting for a confusingly long stretch of time before shifting into flashes of imagery shown throughout the movie. In addition to this, the moth metaphor is never satisfactorily closed off. Though the creatures show up again in the final moments, they are presented in a way that causes their visual purpose to become confusing. What started out as chronicling growth is now associated with death.



“The Third Wife” is worth watching for its excellent photography and acting though it’s unfortunate that the ending causes the viewer to be left feeling more confused than satisfied.
(Review by Bret Oswald)






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Wednesday, July 24, 2019

AFFD2019 - The Sweet Requiem






A group of people are walking across a snowy landscape. The picturesque scene is broken by the close-up imagery of the weather-beaten, worn, and obviously stressed out subjects – Tibetan refugees forging their way to a hopefully better life in Delhi, among them a young girl and her father. Their dire situation is made worse as shots ring out and members of the group fall to their death.



“The Sweet Requiem” directed by Ritu Sarin and Tenzing Sonam (with Sonam also writing the screenplay) offers audiences a confusing narrative as its story jumps around in time. The movie starts off on the wrong foot with this unexplained opening scene and never fully recovers. From the snowy terrain of the Himalayas, Sarin and Sonam move their story to the city of Delhi (in what turns out to be a significant time jump of nearly twenty years) where the film now focuses on twenty-six-year-old Dolkar (Tenzin Dolker), who turns out to have been the young girl seen traveling with her father in the film’s opening scene.



Even as Sarin and Sonam attempt to clear-up their purposefully unchronological story, they only end up raising more questions. A series of flashbacks occur throughout “The Sweet Requiem” that reveal more about how the group got to that moment shown in the film’s prologue, although these are also shown in no apparent order. Viewers are offered the protagonist’s past as if they are sitting inside her memory with events that happened later sometimes shown before events that happened earlier. Dolkar and her father leave behind her mother and sister. Why have these two stayed in Tibet while Dolkar and her father attempt to make the trek into India? No explanation is ever given. As for the refugees’ flight from their home country, Sarin and Sonam make the assumption that their viewers know of the situation in Tibet, never taking an opportunity within the film to attempt to shed light on the subject.



Dolkar is active within Delhi’s Tibetan activist community, forming a close friendship with fellow activist Dorjee (Shavo Dorjee). When an older refugee, Gompo (Jampa Kalsang Tamang), enters into the community, Dolkar is forced to confront the memories of her escape.



“The Sweet Requiem” is finely handled from a few technical perspectives. The camerawork and lighting look excellent, aiding the film in creating its dire atmosphere. As a whole, it leaves a lot to be desired. The acting often feels wooden and the frequent flashbacks cause the film’s editing to feel uneven. Perhaps if it had been put together in a different way “The Sweet Requiem” could have been a more compelling watch. As it’s been released, its ninety-minute length feels like something far longer. It’s not a total misfire, but it’s close.
(Review by Bret Oswald)




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AFFD2019 - Inuyashiki






Based off a manga by Hiroya Oku, director Shinsuke Sato’s feature film “Inuyashiki” is a fresh take on the tiring superhero genre. Previously adapted into an animated mini-series in 2017, the property now shifts into the live-action territory. Working off a screenplay by Hiroshi Hashimoto, Sato’s “Inuyashiki” gets off to a more than promising start, introducing viewers to superhero-to-be Ichirō Inuyashiki (Noritake Kinashi).



Inuyashiki is an aging business man. Humble and submissive, looked down on by his family and friends, he doesn’t line up with the visual idea of a superhero that audiences have come to expect. In fact, if you were to go into this movie cold, knowing nothing of its plot, it comes as quite a surprise when, shortly into the feature, Inuyashiki is hit by an extraterrestrial blast while walking through a park late one night, the darkness of the scene jarringly interrupted by a blindly bright flash.



Outwardly, Inuyashiki looks exactly the same – an older man who’s more than starting to show his age – but inwardly, his muscles and organs have been replaced with complicated, intricate machinery. Now more machine than man but still capable of human emotions, Inuyashiki discovers that his new body, in addition to no longer being able to handle eating miso soup or having much of an appetite, has the capability of healing the sick. He begins using his new powers to heal ailing people throughout the city.



Unfortunately, Inuyashiki wasn’t the only person in the park that night. High school student Hiro Shushigami (Takeru Satô) was also there and also had his body replaced with the alien technology. While Inuyashiki is using his powers for good, Hiro takes the villainous route, using his powers to kill. His method of choice – forming the fingers of his hand into a fake gun and blowing holes in people by nonchalantly saying “pow” as he pulls his pretend trigger, his corny gesture is often met with laughter from his foes before they are, literally, stopped dead in their tracks.



Sato’s film has a lot going for it. The film spends a good portion of its opening act fleshing out Inuyashiki, compelling played by Kinashi who is very convincing in the role. The meek man’s new situation is shown with comedic flair, starting the movie out with a playful tone that is replaced with a more mean-spirited one by the film’s second act as it struggles to connect the audience with this world’s new villain, Hiro.



In all ways, Hiro is the opposite of Inuyashiki. Cold, aloof, and seemingly uncaring, his nature only growing worse as he learns to use his new found powers. He starts off causing general mayhem, moving cars around a parking garage, before shifting into his terminator mode. Once the film shifts gears, taking a darker, more somber tone in place of its initial playfulness, its problems start to arise. “Inuyashiki” starts to grow dull, focusing too much on Hiro’s finger-pointing gun shtick as he begins to openly attack the city through its electronics.



For the most part, the movie’s effects are well-handled. Inuyashiki and Hiro’s mechanical bodies look organic when they are exposed, integrating well into the live-action footage. It’s only when the movie settles into its action heavy climax that the effects start to look noticeably off, but by then you’re either into what the film is doing or not.



Sadly, “Inuyashiki” starts to feel mundanely repetitive by the time it’s over. It crawls its way to the finish line, faking audiences out by starting the credits before a mid-credits stinger scene pops up. The scene is rather lengthy for this sort of thing, causing an already long film to feel longer. This movie is apparently the first of a planned trilogy – the production company, obviously desiring to release more movies in this franchise, using this end credits sequence to leave the story open-ended for a sequel. “Inuyashiki” is an intriguing film that gets off to a good start before getting bogged down by its sluggish conclusion. Perhaps an editing of the final act could have helped with this film’s pacing.
(Review by Bret Oswald)





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Monday, July 22, 2019

This Week at the Alamo Drafthouse




Calling all movie lovers… Here’s what’s happening this week at Alamo Drafthouse DFW!

Take a trip back to 1969 in preparation for the 9th film from Quentin Tarantino with Hollywood 1969 - 4 classic films from the era that inspired ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD. Plus, see ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD in glorious 35mm at 3 Alamo Drafthouse locations in North Texas - Alamo Drafthouse Cedars, Alamo Drafthouse Richardson, and Alamo Drafthouse Las Colinas! And finally, the Video Vortex programming series brings you THE NEON SLIME MIXTAPE, one the greatest films you’ve never seen (since it was only ever released on VHS!). For a full calendar listing, please visit drafthouse.com/dfw/calendar.

See y’all soon at the Alamo Drafthouse!



This Week's Highlights…

July Series: Hollywood 1969
- Celebrate Quentin Tarantino’s upcoming ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD with 4 classic films from Hollywood 1969! This week’s films include TRUE GRIT at North Richland Hills, BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID at Las Colinas, and THE WILD BUNCH at Cedars.

ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD in 35mm!
- See this week’s new release, the 9th film from filmmaker Quentin Tarantino, in glorious 35mm at Alamo Drafthouse Cedars, Alamo Drafthouse Richardson, and Alamo Drafthouse Las Colinas!

Video Vortex - monthly series

- Video Vortex unearths ultra-obscure, ultra-bizarre movies that were only released (or never released!) on home video. Every movie is curated to potentially be the greatest thing you’ve never seen! Here’s your chance to see The Neon Slime Mixtape this week at Denton, Richardson, and Lake Highlands!


MONDAY | JULY 22

Cedars
Screening: Kids Camp: Madagascar at 10:00AM
Screening: UHF Movie Party at 6:50PM

Denton
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 9:50AM
Screening: Strange Things: Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure at 6:30PM

Lake Highlands
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 9:50AM
Screening: Strange Things: Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure at 6:45PM
Screening: Cream Of The Cult: The Cook, The Thief, His Wife, And Her Lover at 9:20PM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Vetted Well at 8:00PM

Las Colinas
Screening: Kids Camp: Kung Fu Panda at 10:00AM
Screening: Strange Things: Weird Science at 7:00PM

North Richland Hills
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 10:00AM
Screening: Strange Things: Mad Max Beyond Thuderdome at 7:00PM

Richardson
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 10:10AM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Glass Half Full at 8:00PM



TUESDAY | JULY 23

Cedars
Screening: Kids Camp: Madagascar at 10:00AM
Screening: The Blair Witch Project at 6:50PM

Denton
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 9:50AM
Screening: Video Vortex: The Neon Slime Mixtape at 8:55PM

Lake Highlands
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 9:50AM
Screening: Jaws Movie Party at 6:50PM
Screening: Video Vortex: The Neon Slime Mixtape at 9:20PM

Las Colinas
Screening: Kids Camp: Kung Fu Panda at 10:00AM
Screening: Hollywood 1969: Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid at 7:00PM

North Richland Hills
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 10:00AM
Screening: The Blair Witch Project at 7:00PM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Glass Half Full at 8:00PM

Richardson
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 10:10AM
Screening: Hopped Up Cinema: True Lies (on 35mm) with Lakewood Brewing at 7:30PM
Screening: Video Vortex: The Neon Slime Mixtape at 9:00PM
Bar Event: Tiki Bingo - Glass Half Full at 7:00PM



WEDNESDAY | JULY 24

All Locations: Teacher Appreciation Wednesdays: a FREE movie ticket for teachers and school faculty/staff at screenings that start before 5:00pm. Teacher-themed special menu available ALL DAY for everyone!

Cedars
Screening: Kids Camp: Madagascar at 10:00AM
Screening: Hollywood 1969: The Wild Bunch at 6:30PM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Vetted Well at 8:00PM

Denton
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 9:50AM
Screening: UHF Movie Party at 6:50PM

Lake Highlands
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 9:50AM

Las Colinas
Screening: Kids Camp: Kung Fu Panda at 10:00AM
Screening: Drop Dead Gorgeous at 6:30PM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Vetted Well at 8:00PM

North Richland Hills
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 10:00AM
Screening: Movie Party: Purple Rain at 7:00PM

Richardson
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 10:10AM
Screening: UHF Movie Party at 6:50PM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Glass Half Full at 8:00PM



THURSDAY | JULY 25
Cedars
Screening: Kids Camp: Madagascar at 10:00AM

Denton
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 10:00AM

Lake Highlands
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 10:00AM

Las Colinas
Screening: Kids Camp: Kung Fu Panda at 9:55AM

North Richland Hills
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 10:00AM

Richardson
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 10:00AM



FRIDAY | JULY 26
Cedars
Screening: Kids Camp: Madagascar at 9:50AM

Denton
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 10:00AM

Lake Highlands
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 10:00AM

Las Colinas
Screening: Kids Camp: Kung Fu Panda at 10:00AM
Screening: Cinema With The Snake: Once Upon A Time In Hollywood at 8:00PM

North Richland Hills
Screening: Kids Camp: Wallace And Gromit: The Curse Of The Were-Rabbit at 10:00AM

Richardson
Screening: Kids Camp: The Neverending Story at 10:10AM
Screening: Dread Presents Assassinaut at 9:00PM



SATURDAY | JULY 27
Cedars
Screening: PBS Kids at the Alamo: Wild Kratts Alaska: Hero’s Journey at 10:00AM

Denton
Screening: PBS Kids at the Alamo: Wild Kratts Alaska: Hero’s Journey at 10:00AM
Screening: Hollywood 1969: The Wild Bunch at 6:30PM

Lake Highlands
Screening: Dallas Child Presents: The Secret Life Of Pets Cereal Party at 10:10AM

Las Colinas
Screening: PBS Kids at the Alamo: Wild Kratts Alaska: Hero’s Journey at 10:00AM

North Richland Hills
Screening: PBS Kids at the Alamo: Wild Kratts Alaska: Hero’s Journey at 10:00AM
Screening: Hollywood 1969: Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid at 12:45PM

Richardson
Screening: PBS Kids at the Alamo: Wild Kratts Alaska: Hero’s Journey at 10:10AM
Screening: Master Pancake: Keanu-Thon at 7:30PM



SUNDAY | JULY 28
Cedars
Screening: PBS Kids at the Alamo: Wild Kratts Alaska: Hero’s Journey at 9:50AM
Screening: The Last Starfighter at 7:30PM

Denton
Screening: PBS Kids at the Alamo: Wild Kratts Alaska: Hero’s Journey at 10:00AM
Screening: The Last Starfighter at 6:30PM
Bar Event: Geeks Who Drink - Vetted Well at 7:00PM

Las Colinas
Screening: PBS Kids at the Alamo: Wild Kratts Alaska: Hero’s Journey at 10:00AM

North Richland Hills
Screening: PBS Kids at the Alamo: Wild Kratts Alaska: Hero’s Journey at 10:00AM
Screening: Hollywood 1969: True Grit at 12:45PM

Richardson
Screening: PBS Kids at the Alamo: Wild Kratts Alaska: Hero’s Journey at 10:10AM
Screening: Eyes Wide Shut at 9:00PM



First Run Movies Now Playing...
Crawl
Midsommar
Spider-Man: Far From Home
Stuber
The Art Of Self Defense
The Lion King
Toy Story 4
Yesterday

Premiering This Week...

Once Upon A Time In Hollywood
Once Upon A Time In Hollywood (in 35mm)

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Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | www.drafthouse.com





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Anime-Zing Monthly Series Launches at the Alamo Drafthouse






ANIME-ZING – A NEW MONTHLY SERIES DEVOTED TO ANIME LAUNCHES AT ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE IN AUGUST

Anime delivers a colorful world of giant robots, giggling wizards, and post-apocalyptic death machines – but it's also so much more. Beginning in August, Alamo Drafthouse will bring the best of the Japanese artform back to the big screen with ANIME-ZING, a new monthly programming series. ANIME-ZING is dedicated to sharing the wonders of anime with everyone – die-hard enthusiasts and those just curious to see what all the hype is about.

Starting with titles like NINJA SCROLL, MILLENNIUM ACTRESS and VAMPIRE HUNTER D, ANIME-ZING takes a deep dive into the amazing archive of Japanese animation, from the genre-soaked universe of science fiction and fantasy to the emotionally rich dramas about the world right outside our window.

Get tickets to NINJA SCROLL here, or check out the official ANIME-ZING series page for more info and upcoming shows.
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Alamo Drafthouse DFW links

Facebook: facebook.com/AlamoDrafthouseDFW
Twitter: twitter.com/AlamoDFW
Instagram: instagram.com/alamodfw
Website: drafthouse.com/dfw


About Alamo Drafthouse
Alamo Drafthouse Cinema was founded in 1997 as a single-screen mom and pop repertory theater in Austin, TX. Twenty-two years later, with 40 locations and counting, Alamo Drafthouse has been called "the best theater in America" by Entertainment Weekly and "the best theater in the world" by Wired. Alamo Drafthouse has built a reputation as a movie lover's oasis not only by combining food and drink service with the movie-going experience, but also introducing unique programming and high-profile, star-studded special events. Alamo Drafthouse created Fantastic Fest, a world renowned film festival dubbed "The Geek Telluride" by Variety. Fantastic Fest showcases eight days of genre cinema from independents, international filmmakers and major Hollywood studios. Alamo Drafthouse's collectible art gallery, Mondo, offers breathtaking, original products featuring designs from world-famous artists based on licenses for popular TV and Movie properties including Star Wars, Star Trek & Universal Monsters. Alamo Drafthouse continues to expand its brand in new and exciting ways, including Birth.Movies.Death., an entertainment content platform for movie lovers, and the American Genre Film Archive, a nonprofit film archive dedicated to preserving, restoring and sharing film.




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Sunday, July 21, 2019

AFFD2019 - Missbehavior





In his film “Missbehavior,” writer / director Ho-Cheung Pang takes a single-minded theme for his movie’s ribald humor, building his movie off of a paper-thin concept – the quest for a bottle of breast milk. “Missbehavior” is a feature that’s more interested in relishing in its ridiculousness without thinking whether it should. It quickly places itself in the gutter and stays there.



The film gets its start when, following a cheeky seventies era title sequence, a policewoman (Gigi Leung) is confronted by her estranged friend (Isabel Chan) who begins to tell of the recent woes of their friend June (June Lam). When June’s boss, Luna Fu (Isabella Leung), asked her to make a cup of coffee for a prospective client, a miscommunication led June to make the coffee using Fu’s own refrigerated breast milk instead of the office’s low-fat milk. Fu’s breast milk is in the company refrigerator in a generic glass bottle with the letters “LF” taped on it. Maybe this is a cultural barrier but Fu’s bottle of milk looks nothing like a bottle you’d expect to find in a store, especially with its hand-written label, making the film’s premise one that’s already highly implausible. Leung and Chan’s characters start a crusade to bring their group of friends, now only held together by an internet chat group calling themselves “the bitches,” together to help June get a bottle of the precious liquid before her boss goes home for the day.



It’s possible to make an excellent film out of a ludicrous premise but “Missbehavior” doesn’t even come close to being a passable one. Jokes fall flat, again perhaps due to cultural barriers, without a single one of the ensuing shenanigans causing even a slight smirk (it’s probably a good idea to note that there were multiple walk-outs during this screening).



“Missbehavior” is driven by its own misguided manic energy. It opens with a nauseously quick-paced editing style that never lets up as it quickly introduces the lead group of characters and begins to flesh out the quarrels within the group. Since so many characters are introduced at once, it can be a bit hard to decipher who is who throughout the film’s opening act. Once the movie settles into its groove (for better or worse – in my taste worse) and established its characters, it’s easier to identify and keep up with who’s who.



Pang keeps his film rolling with increasingly absurd episodes ranging from breaking-and-entering (in bright blue bodysuits) to posing as a fictional non-profit organization outside the breast-feeding room in a mall. There’s even an aside in one of the movie’s vignette-like scenarios about one of the women having to poop in a restroom in the elementary school, putting the film’s frequent potty-driven humor in the spotlight. Within each episode, strung together via a connecting device featuring a cityscape broken up with shots of the group, Pang enters into dramatic territory working to resolve the issues that have arisen within this group of friends.



“Missbehavior” is sure to be divisive with it’s over-the-top and often juvenile humor, though I suspect most will not find this one in the slightest bit enjoyable.
(Review by Bret Oswald)





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AFFD2019 - Youngju





After the sudden death of her parents, Youngju (Kim Hyang-Gi) has her childhood stolen away, left with the care of her younger brother Youngin (Tang Jun-Sang). Five years later, the siblings living situation has only worsened. Youngju is now on the cusp of turning twenty, entering into adulthood with no degree and no career prospects – she works stocking shelves. Her aunt (Chang Hyae-Jin), who was left with the fiscal responsibilities of Youngju’s parents (their debt and paying for the care of their children), wants Youngju to sell their apartment. Desperate to hold on to their home, Youngju denies her aunt’s demand but finances are on the verge of evaporating and trouble soon arises.



Writer / director Cha Sung-Duk’s debut feature “Youngju,” titled after it’s lead character, is a melancholic story about loss, its effects, and finding comfort (and maybe forgiveness) in surprising places. Youngin falls in with the wrong crowd and gets himself into legal trouble. Now in need of money to keep Youngin from being locked up and having burned bridges with her aunt, Youngju decides to confront the man responsible for her parents’ deaths in hopes of demanding money from him to help with her financial woes.



Her search leads her to the workplace, a small shop selling tofu, of Sang-Moon (Yoo Jae-Myeong) and his wife Hyang-Sook (Kim Ho-Jung). Without telling them who she is, Youngju starts working for the couple. But instead of fulfilling her initial desire for revenge, Youngju finds herself sucked into the lives of the troubled couple, who have had their own share of dilemmas and set-backs due to the accident caused by Sang-Moon.



“Youngju” is a character driven film, a movie more focused on exploring its characters’ emotions and their interactions with each other. Sung-Duk doesn’t present Sang-Moon as someone to be reviled (or even to pity). He’s just an everyday man on the street who had an accident that, unfortunately had long-lasting, devastating ramifications. Sung-Duk keeps the story simple, keeping the film dramatic without delving into soap-opera like melodrama.



The actors do a fine job in their respective roles. Kim Ho-Jung fares the best of the lead cast. She does a fantastic job of portraying the nurturing wife of Sang-Moon, attaching herself to Youngju in lieu of her own child. The other roles feel fairly typical for this type of film. The performances work in context of the movie but none of the actors, other than Ho-Jung, really stood-out.



Like the acting, the cinematography doesn’t offer up much of note. Again, like the acting, it’s typical for this type of film. The camera’s often unsteady, bobbing around slightly instead of keeping a steady shot. It also works in context of the movie but doesn’t leave the audience with any memorable imagery.



Sung-Duk draws the story to an emotional charged climax that, unfortunately, overstays its welcome. The point is made but instead of moving on and closing out the film, Sung-Duk lingers for an extended period of time on his subject. What could have been a satisfying conclusion to this quiet story is dragged out to nearly unbearable lengths. It gets its point across but leaves the audience to stew in it, a decision that may cause some viewers to leave with feelings of frustration rather than release.



Worthy of checking out if you are into emotionally and character-driven dramas. Otherwise, it’s probably better to seek out another film to view.
(Review by Bret Oswald)



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Movies Scheduled for the Week of Jul 21 - Jul 27


Hot enuff for y'all out there. We still have to endure August and September. It's very cool viewing at the Angelika this week with the Asian Film Festival Dallas with their amazing slate of curated films that let you glimpse into a countries, landscapes, people and stories that you can't find anywhere else. Festival ends on Thursday. Don't miss out!

I know everyone wants to get passes to the Hollywood screening next week. And the folks that won passes will most likely be using theirs. Asking people to give them up to you when there are contests still pending... Enter them.

Jul 21 - Jul 27

Mon - Jul 22

Earth X: Into the Canyon - 7:00 pm - Angelika Dallas
This Changes Everything - 7:00 pm - Various DFW locations

Tue - Jul 23

Brian Banks - 6:30 pm - AMC Northpark
Once Upon a Time in Hollywood - 7:00 pm - Alamo Richardson

Wed - Jul 24

Farewell - 7:00 pm - AMC Northpark
Good Boys - 7:30 pm - Angelika






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Thursday, July 18, 2019

This Changes Everything







(Review by Chase Lee)



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Stuber





The film Stuber showcases Kumail Nanjiani as a rather chill easy-going Uber driver ( Stu) whole by chance becones caught up in a rather bloody and violent police/ criminal car chase across LA, tracking a really bad drug dealer.

LAPD detective Vic Manning (Dave Bautista) hires Stu when his car is destroyed because he wrecked it while trying to drive after LASIX surgery against Dr orders. Both are a study in personality contrasts and intensity levels, especially because Stu is desperately trying to make a good impression and earn a coveted five star passenger rating, after several rides hilariously leave him with one star or worse ratings. Vic is extremely desperate and blindly driven in getting this guy, who escaped him many years earlier.

Stu and his fastidiously maintained Uber car find themselves in for the ride and experience of their lives. Stu isn't exactly the bravest branch on the tree, a rather innocent and peace living guy. We are often pleasantly entertained by his shocked and panicked reactions as things unfold in an odd combination of violence and comedy.

Be forewarned. The film is quite violent. Sometimes it makes sense and sometimes it just feels off. A few innocent bystanders are taken out in the process of the pursuit and that's just frustrating. Evil drug dealers you know. The casting is all there and they do the best they can with a rather predictable story line. It is certainly amusing in parts.

Happily, Mira Sorvino makes a return to the screen but her talents seem somewhat wasted. Joining her are Betty Gilpin and Karen Gillan in additional minor roles. One being the friend/ hook up Stu has been trying to get to all day and night long as he begins to realize he's going to be busy driving and ultimately aiding Vic until his goal is realized. No matter how long it takes.

Opinions appear mixed. Critics are not enthused but audiences are throwing their interest into this pairing.
(Review by Cheryl Wurtz)






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