The Dallas Movie Screening Group

This is the homepage of the Dallas Movie Screening Group. To join our mailing list you must sign up at our group page on Yahoo. You will then be connected to receive notices on how to find passes to the local screenings in the DFW area. It's up to you to pickup or sign up for passes. You can also barter, trade or just giveaway passes you don't want, need or share with other members of the group. Please read the instructions on the Yahoo page very carefully before posting. This group is closely moderated so that your mail box is not full of spam or other unnecessary mail. We appreciate everyone's consideration and cooperation.

You can use this homepage for posting comments, reviews, and other things that cannot be posted to the group. Of course spam is not allowed. Thanks!

To join the Dallas Movie Screening Yahoo Group:
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Reesa's Reviews can also be found at:
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Logo art by Steve Cruz http://www.mfagallery.com

Website and Group Contact: dalscreenings@gmail.com

Saturday, July 25, 2015

AFFD: A Girl Next Door




A Girl at My Door questions the real minds of people beyond their public figure. It also questions our hearts and asks how far we are willing to go to do the mandatory for the right in the world. The film takes us to a difficult level in the exploration of a police chief’s interactions with a severely abused girl and her corrections of what is wrong in her boundaries. I was horrified in a film that was a thousand miles away from the dumb horror genre. The actors seemed to permeate their story through the screen. Their acting would have surely won at least one Academy Award in the US. I truly believed the man playing Mr. Park, the child’s father, was the most sadistic father one had ever met. In reality I hope that off the camera he had a great relationship with the actress playing Dohee, the child. One of the first parts in this winding path is when the chief accidentally sprays Dohee with water from her car. She immediately stops while the child runs away and the audience is let known the specialness of the chief’s soul. Unlike when I get soaked during a storm while waiting for the bus, here is a character who responds to a stranger with immediate consideration. The chief has been transferred to this town along the water for an occurrence in Seoul that brought trouble. It is a little bit of semi-comedic relief when the chief brings her own case of water because she does not trust the tap water in the town. An older lady responds with a little offended talk. The child with her dirty hair and dirt on her clothes is like a familiar landmark leading to a destination of darkness. I knew from the first scenes of Dohee that she was in a harmful situation. The horridness I mentioned earlier immediately jumps aboard like a fish on a boat when you see the father, Mr. Park, holding the child’s head and punching her face. He screams “Come here you little b*@!#!”. The demons that can come into people surround Dohee as you realize even her Grandmother is on her son’s side. The chief enters the scene of the continued beating and puts the father into an arm trap while the Grandmother screams. This circumstance of an endangered child is very real and could be right in your school, work, or rec center. This expertly laid out screenplay does not let us pretend or not recognize the children who are living in a pool of evil. These human beings need people like the police chief to rescue them before they drown.
(Review by Wyatt Head)



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